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Prince William’s ‘non-stop grief’ after watching England - supported by Kate - beat Wales in the Six Nations

The Prince of Wales and the Princess of Wales sing the Welsh national anthem in the stands ahead of the Saturday’s Six Nations match in Cardiff (PA)
The Prince of Wales and the Princess of Wales sing the Welsh national anthem in the stands ahead of the Saturday’s Six Nations match in Cardiff (PA)

Prince William has admitted he had “non-stop grief” after watching the Welsh rugby team lose to England in the Six Nations alongside his wife Kate, who was cheering on the English.

It was a case of divided loyalties at the Principality Stadium in Cardiff on Saturday with the Prince and Princess of Wales supporting opposing teams as the away side triumphed 20-10.

William is patron of the Welsh Rugby Union, while Kate is patron of the Rugby Football Union - having taken over the role from the Duke of Sussex a year ago.

Ahead of the much-anticipated match, the famously competitive royals joked about supporting rival teams and said it would be a “tense” journey home regardless of who was victorious.

William and Kate visiting Brynawel Rehabilitation Centre on Tuesday (AP)
William and Kate visiting Brynawel Rehabilitation Centre on Tuesday (AP)

On Tuesday, William was asked several times about the match as the couple visited a rehabilitation centre in Pontyclun, near Cardiff.

Asked if he enjoyed the game, the Prince of Wales joked: “Not really.”

He later told volunteers at Brynawel Rehabilitation Centre: “I’ve had non-stop grief about it all weekend.”

Following the final score, William and Kate posted a message on their social media in both English and Welsh.

It read: “Back in Cardiff for Welsh Rugby Union vs England Rugby. Fantastic to meet the Welsh Rugby Charitable Trust, stadium staff and all the volunteers that make the game what it is. Thank you for having us Six Nations Rugby!”

During Tuesday’s visit, Kate was invited to plant some sweet William seeds near the garden and allotments.

Seeing the name of the flowers, William laughed.

Volunteer gardener Vanessa Townsend helped Kate sow the seeds and said: “They will flower in two years.

“I’ll make sure you get some.”

Kate laughs as she plants sweet William seeds (AP)
Kate laughs as she plants sweet William seeds (AP)

As part of their visit, the Prince and Princess of Wales announced they would be collaborating with Brynawel Rehabilitation Centre to create a set of therapy allotments and garden, with their foundation working alongside Life at No.27 - a horticultural therapy and mental health counselling provider.

The allotments will be the first of six gardens that will eventually be created across South Wales.

Near the site’s current garden, William spoke to recovery manager Claire Holloway, and trustees Marc Penny and Dai McBride.

They were also greeted by a therapy dog, seven-year-old Great Dane, Ragnar.

Stroking Ragnar, William commented on the dog’s “big ears”, while Kate said: “He must be very popular.”

Two-year-old Cora Phillips gave Kate a bunch of daffodils as the royal couple left.

Cora’s mother Michelle Phillips, from Llanharan, said: “Oh my goodness, I did not expect that in a million years.”

Turning to her daughter, she said: “We just met a princess.

“We’re never going to forget that.”