The Queen’s funeral: what time is it, how long will it last and how to watch it on TV

·3-min read
The Queen’s funeral: what time is it, how long will it last and how to watch it on TV

The United Kingdom has been observing a period of mourning following the death of Queen Elizabeth II.

Buckingham Palace confirmed that the Queen died on Thursday September 8, releasing a statement that read: “The Queen died peacefully at Balmoral this afternoon.

“The King and The Queen Consort will remain at Balmoral this evening and will return to London tomorrow,” it said.

While billions of people across the globe are expected to tune in on television to say goodbye to the longest-reigning monarch, here’s everything you need to know about the funeral of Queen Elizabeth II.

HM Queen Elizabeth II’s State Funeral: Best Pictures

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What time is it, how long will it last and how can you watch it on TV.

What time is the Queen’s funeral?

The Queen’s funeral will take place on Monday, September 19. It will start at 11am, with a procession from Westminster Hall beginning at 10.35 am.

A nationwide two-minute silence will then be held at 12pm.

How long will the Queen’s funeral last?

Below are the timings for the Queen’s funeral:

6.30am: Lying in state at Westminster Hall ends.

8am: The doors to Westminster Abbey, where the funeral will be held, are opened.

10.35am: Her Majesty the Queen’s coffin will travel in the state gun carriage to Westminster Abbey. A procession will lead through New Palace Yard, Parliament Square and Broad Sanctury before reaching Westminster Abbey.

It will be led by King Charles III, Princess Anne, Prince Andrew, Prince Edward, and Prince William and Prince Harry.

10.52am: The Queen’s coffin arrives at Westminster Abbey.

11am: The Queen’s funeral service starts.

11.55am: The funeral ends with the sounds of the Last Post.

12pm: UK observes a two-minute silence at the end of the Queen’s funeral.

12.15pm: The Queen’s coffin will travels from Westminster Abbey to Wellington Arch near Hyde Park Corner, before continuing on to Windsor. King Charles and other members of the royal family will walk behind the coffin to Wellington Arch, via Parliament Square, Parliament Street, Whitehall, Horse Guards, The Mall, Queen’s Gardens, finally Constitution Hill and Apsley Way.

1pm: The Queen’s coffin is moved from the state gun carriage to the state hearse and will then be taken to Windsor.

3.15pm: Final procession from St George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle, via the Long Walk, begins at Shaw Farm Gate on Albert Road.

4pm: The Queen’s coffin carried into St George’s Chapel, where a televised committal service held by the Dean of Windsor will take place.

7.30pm: Queen Elizabeth II is interred alongside Prince Philip at King George VI Memorial Chapel in Windsor Castle privately.

How can I watch the Queen’s funeral on TV?

The Queen’s funeral will be televised on BBC and BBC News. It will also be available to stream on BBC iPlayer, and coverage will begin at 8am.

ITV will run live coverage, with broadcasting starting at 6am and all five channels and ITV Hub simulcasting coverage.

Sky News confirmed its broadcast schedule for the funeral, with live coverage throughout the day available free on Sky News and the Sky News App, YouTube and Freeview.

The funeral procession will be broadcast, alongside coverage of the state funeral service.

The coverage plans for Channel 4 are yet to be announced but we will update this page once we know more.

Cinema chains including Curzon, Arc and Vue will screen the funeral free, and will cancel all other film showings for the day, with cinemagoers required to pre-book their seats.

It is expected that the funeral will be one of the most-watched events in history, with billions around the world tuning in.

In 2021, Prince Philip’s funeral was viewed by 13 million in the UK, while British viewing figures for Diana’s funeral on September 6, 1997 reached 32.1 million.