Replica of Titanic to set sail in 2022, and it will follow the route of the doomed ship

Rob Waugh
Contributor
The Titanic II will trace the original’s planned route from England to New York (Picture Blue Star Line)

A replica of the Titanic will set sail in 2022 – and will trace the same route as the original liner, which sank in 1912.

It will carry 2,400 passengers and 900 crew, and has the same layout and interiors as the original, but with updated safety features and navigation.

The $500 million (£385m) project by Blue Star Line stalled for several years due to a financial dispute, but will now go ahead with the two-week maiden voyage scheduled for 2022.

The original Titanic sank on April 15 1912 after striking an iceberg – and both the ship’s architect and its captain were among 1,500 people who died in the disaster.

It will have the same layout as the original (Blue Star Line)

The replica has been built by an Australian company, Blue Star Line.

Chairman Clive Palmer said, ‘The ship will follow the original journey, carrying passengers from Southampton to New York, but she will also circumnavigate the globe, inspiring and enchanting people while attracting unrivalled attention, intrigue and mystery in every port she visits.’

Palmer began the project in 2012, but work on the liner was suspended in 2015 due to a financial dispute over royalties.

Titanic II Will Set Sail in 2022 on Same Route as First

The company said, ‘Now those matters have been resolved, work has recommenced to build and operate Titanic ll.’

The company said that design work and wave testing was already complete, but did not confirm a date for the build.

Australian mining billionaire Clive Palmer said when he announced the project, ‘In 1912 the Titanic was the ship of dreams. For over a century Titanic’s legend has been powered by mystery, intrigue and respect for all she stood for.

‘Millions have dreamt of sailing on her, seeing her in port and experiencing her unique majesty. Titanic II will be the ship where those dreams come true.’