Who is reportedly on Boris Johnson’s honours list? From Nadine Dorries to Shaun Bailey

Boris Johnson’s list comes as Liz Truss is also due to announce resignation honours after her short-lived premiership (PA Wire)
Boris Johnson’s list comes as Liz Truss is also due to announce resignation honours after her short-lived premiership (PA Wire)

Boris Johnson has reportedly nominated about 20 people for peerages in his resignation honours list.

Some of the names put forward by the ex-PM, who left office in September, have agreed to delay heading to the Lords until the end of the current Parliament. This is to spare Prime Minister Rishi Sunak by-elections.

Mr Johnson’s list comes as Liz Truss is also due to announce resignation honours following her short-lived premiership.

According to the Daily Express, the honours would cost British taxpayers £559,180 a year. This is based on estimates by the Electoral Reform Society of an annual cost of £27,959 per peer.

Here’s everything you need to know about Mr Johnson’s honours list.

What is an honours list?

The prime minister’s resignation honours are distinctions granted by an outgoing PM.

The current monarch may be asked to bestow any number of people with peerages, knighthoods, damehoods, or other honours under the British honours system.

In the case of peerages, the House of Lords Appointments Commission vets the list.

Who is on Boris Johnson’s honours list?

The Times reports that former culture secretary Nadine Dorries, Cop26 president Alok Sharma, Scottish Secretary Alister Jack, and ex-minister Nigel Adams are anticipated to be on Mr Johnson's list.

Mr Johnson has also reportedly nominated two of his trusted advisers to become the youngest life peers in history: Ross Kempsell, a former political director for the Conservative Party, and Charlotte Owen, a former personal assistant to the ex-prime minister.

Shaun Bailey, the former London mayoral candidate who faced a backlash for attending a mid-lockdown Christmas party, is also said to be on the list.

Ben Houchen, the Tory mayor for Tees Valley, Kulveer Ranger, a former adviser to Mr Johnson at City Hall and Carphone Warehouse co-founder David Ross, a Conservative donor, are also said to be included.

What has the reaction been to the honours list?

The prime minister should "refuse to do Boris Johnson's bidding," Labour's deputy leader Angela Rayner has said, and reject his demands.

“This disgraced ex-prime minister’s plot to dodge democracy by trying to reward his MP lackeys with promised jobs for life in the House of Lords yet again puts the Tory Party’s interests before the public’s,” she said.

Agreeing with Ms Rayner, Andy McDonald, Labour MP for Middlesbrough, tweeted: “This is what happens when you have a second parliamentary chamber based on parentage and patronage. The House of Lords should be abolished but the spectacle of a disgraced Prime Minister handing out peerages to his acolytes is utterly outrageous.”

Reacting to the news, the Women’s Equality Party tweeted: “Honour (noun): the quality of knowing or doing what is morally right.”