Royal baby name: The most likely name for William and Kate's third child

Chelsea Ritschel

After months of excitement and guessing, the Duchess of Cambridge has officially given birth to a baby boy on April 23 2018.

The announcement comes after punters were convinced the newest royal would be Her Royal Highness, with bets on girl names surging far ahead and some bookmakers suspended betting on gender.

But since fan-favourite Mary is no longer a possibility, gamblers have put their money on a few interesting boy names for the new baby.


“When it comes to boys names, Edward has been by far the most popular selection at eight to one, with Arthur fancied too. Speaking to our traders, Edward has edged the betting in terms of the actual amount of bets on the name,” a spokesman for Paddy Power Betfair said.

However, now Arthur has emerged as the most likely moniker, with 2/1 odds - with Edward falling to 9/1 odds.

Prince George, Princess Charlotte, and Prince Arthur does have a nice ring to it.

James is following closely behind, with 4/1 odds.

But many believe Fredrick, as well as variations including Fred/Frederick are also a likely possibility - with 8/1 odds the baby will be named after the former Prince of Wales.

Other possibilities for the new prince include Thomas, Philip, Jack, or Henry.

Names the new prince isn't likely to be named include Archie, Hugo, or Tarquin - which have 100/1 odds.

And we think it is a safe bet to say Leroy or Nigel won't be selected - as bets on these name are currently at odds of 500/1.

However, what we do know for sure is the new royal baby will have an impressive title - despite technically being a commoner.

The newest addition to the royal family will go by His Royal Highness Prince (name) of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and will be in line to the throne behind Princess Charlotte.

His Royal Highness was born weighing 8lbs 7oz and we cannot wait to learn his name.

His gender came as a complete surprise, and maybe his name will as well.

This article was originally published on April 3 2018 and has since been updated.