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Stephen Lawrence's mother Doreen was effectively 'gaslit' by Daily Mail, court told - as Harry makes appearance

The mother of murdered teenager Stephen Lawrence was effectively "gaslit" by the Daily Mail, the High Court has been told - as Prince Harry made a brief appearance for the end of the privacy hearing.

Baroness Doreen Lawrence is one of a number of high-profile individuals, including the Duke of Sussex, accusing the newspaper's publishers Associated Newspapers Limited (ANL) of concealing "wrongdoing" over the alleged unlawful gathering of their private information.

ANL vehemently denies the claims and has argued for the case to be dismissed. A four-day preliminary hearing has now concluded, with the judge to deliver a decision on whether the case should go to trial in writing at a later date.

During Thursday's session, barrister David Sherborne, representing the claimant group - which also includes Sir Elton John, Liz Hurley, Sadie Frost and former Liberal Democrat MP Sir Simon Hughes - said they had a "compelling case".

It is alleged ANL commissioned 19 different private investigators to carry out a series of unlawful acts from 1993 to 2011 and beyond, which in some instances informed articles, Mr Sherborne said.

The group was "thrown off the scent by the way in which the articles were written", the court heard.

Mr Sherborne later read out extracts from Baroness Lawrence's witness statement, in which she said she felt "played for a fool" by the Daily Mail, believing the newspaper "really cared" about the injustice of the murder of her son Stephen.

"They were supposed to be our allies and friends, the good people, not the bad," she said. Baroness Lawrence said she had believed information in articles about her had come from the police.

Mr Sherborne told the court: "That is nothing short of gaslighting Baroness Lawrence, that's the form of concealment we are talking about."

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The term gaslighting means to manipulate someone into questioning their own sanity or powers of reasoning.

Known as a campaigner and reformer, Baroness Lawrence has devoted herself to seeking justice for her 18-year-old son, an aspiring architect who was murdered in an unprovoked racist attack in southeast London in 1993.

The Daily Mail, under then editor Paul Dacre, campaigned to bring Mr Lawrence's killers to justice, running a front page in 1997 that saw the newspaper brand five suspects "Murderers" - challenging them to sue if the headline was incorrect.

Baroness Lawrence was present in court for part of Thursday's session, as were Harry and Sir Elton's husband David Furnish, following appearances earlier in the week from Sir Elton and Frost.

Trial could be 'substantial' if it does go ahead

Adrian Beltrami KC, representing the publisher, previously told the court that all the claims "are rejected by the defendant in their entirety as are the unfounded allegations that are repeatedly made that the defendant either misled the Leveson Inquiry or concealed evidence from the Leveson Inquiry".

The lawyer said the legal action against ANL has "no real prospects of succeeding" and is "barred" under a legal period of limitation.

After hearing the final arguments in the preliminary hearing, Mr Justice Nicklin told the court he would hand down his judgment on whether the case should go to trial as soon as he can.

He indicated earlier in the session that if the case does go to trial, it could be one that lasts for a "substantial period of time".

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After hearing Baroness Lawrence's claims during the first day of the preliminary hearing, an ANL spokesperson said: "While the Mail's admiration for Baroness Lawrence remains undimmed, we are profoundly saddened that she has been persuaded to bring this case.

"The Mail remains hugely proud of its pivotal role in campaigning for justice for Stephen Lawrence. Its famous "Murderers" front page triggered the Macpherson report [an inquiry into Mr Lawrence's death].

"Associated Newspapers, which owns the Daily Mail and Mail on Sunday, vigorously denies all the claims against it."