Ben Cohen's ex wife calls for 'Strictly' to 'improve' support for contestants' families amid show's curse

Deepika Rajani
Contributor
SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - NOVEMBER 23: Ben and Abby Cohen during the International Rugby Board Awards at Wharf 8 November 23, 2003 in Sydney, Australia. (Photo by Dave Rogers/Getty Images)

Ben Cohen’s ex-wife Abby Cohen has called for Strictly Come Dancing to “improve” the support they provide the families of contestants who appear on the show.

In the aftermath of ITV’s decision to permanently cancel the Jeremy Kyle Show following the death of guest Steven Dymond a week after he appeared on the programme, various reality TV shows have been scrutinised for their aftercare service.

Cohen’s marriage to Abby ended after his appearance on Strictly in 2013. Having succumbed to the show’s infamous curse, Cohen moved on with dance partner Kristina Rihanoff.

Read more: 'Strictly' dancer Amy Dowden opens up about secret health battle

Opening up about the impact her divorce had on her, Abby revealed that “there could be some improvement” in the way Strictly provides care and support for family members.

“It’s not a tragedy story – it’s a story of recovery,” she added to the Mirror.

“I’ve put all my energy into my girls, who come first, and my job. I can give myself a pat on the back, as well as my friends and family who have supported me through a really rubbish past five years.

“I don’t think I’m ever going to get over it. But I’m taking a new path.”

Ben Cohen fell for Kristina Rihanoff following their time on Strictly Come Dancing (Photo by Joel Ryan/Invision/AP)

Meanwhile, BBC newsreader Huw Edwards has reacted to the rumours that he is set to join the line up for this year’s series.

Read more: Simon Webbe asked for a single dance partner to avoid the ‘the curse’

“I’d have a conversation about it. I think in all honesty I think it’s a difficult thing to do in my day-to-day job. That's the strongest hint I can give you,” he told Express.co.uk.

Ben Cohen's ex wife has called for Strictly to improve the support they offer to families of the contestants taking part (Photo: Press Association)

“Combined with being BBC’s chief news anchor would be quite difficult. In future, when my professional life might be in a different shape, maybe it would look like a different kind of challenge.

“Am I terrified by the thought of it? Yes. Do my kids want me to do it? No. All of these are different kinds of factors, aren’t they? The honest answer is I’ve not been asked but if I was asked I think my current job would make it quite difficult.”