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Sunday's art show went well

Mar. 19—RUSHVILLE — A weekend exhibit at the Booker T. Washington Community Center, 525 E. Seventh Street, is being hailed a success by its organizers.

Amelia Perkins said she was surprised the exhibit attracted people from people from outside the Rushville/Rush County community and added, "I am deeply touched, thrilled, amazed and excited by the public opening of photographs and artwork by Malcolm Perkins. I am Malcolm's sister, and contacted Shelly King to request an exhibit in the gallery at Booker T. Washington building. I am not member of Imagine;nation; however, I strongly believe in their mission statement. I am retired and volunteered for this exhibit. I am truly grateful to David Solomon, Dennis Simmons, Dena Vittorio, Kathie Jackley and Shelly King for their time, talents, support and encouragement!"

As indicated, the public exhibit, which was open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, featured the work of 1975 Rushville Consolidated High School graduate Malcolm Perkins, who was born in 1956 and passed away in 1998.

The exhibit features a retrospective of Perkins' work, who, before his death, credited his interest in the arts to former RCHS teacher Melvin Gray.

Perkins was also the managing director and artist-in-residence of the Oddities and Originals Art Studio in Homer during the 1980s. He preferred abstract expressionism and believed that painting is "an expression of pure brilliance in color."

In addition to the ongoing exhibit, Carol Jenkins-Davis Park, 409 N. Fort Wayne Road, is the new home of a few of Perkins' metal sculptures. Entitled "Joyous Journey of Life," the sculptures were recently installed through the united effort of Rush County organizations.

Amelia B. Perkins, Malcolm's sister, donated the sculptures as a living tribute to her brother.

The exhibit of Perkins' paintings in mixed media and photography will continue through June 7 in the upstairs gallery at the Booker T. Washington building.

Sunday's event was hosted by Imagine:nation, the Arts & Cultural Council of Rush County.