Tube map redesigned by TfL to mark Black History Month

·2-min read

The Tube map has been recreated to honour hundreds of people who helped shape black history in Britain.

All 272 stations have been renamed after figures dating from pre-Tudor times to the present day, including the first black woman to serve in the Royal Navy and a Victorian circus owner immortalised by The Beatles.

More recent names include the novelist Andrea Levy, the comedian Felix Dexter, the Hot Chocolate singer Errol Brown and the footballers Laurie Cunningham and Justin Fashanu.

The map has been produced by Transport for London in partnership with Black Cultural Archives to mark Black History Month.

 (TfL)
(TfL)

Several stations have been renamed after well-known inhabitants. Tottenham Hale becomes Bernie Grant Centre, after the building in honour of the former Labour MP, while Battersea Power Station becomes John Archer, who as mayor of Battersea was the first black mayor in London.

Barons Court is renamed William Brown, the name used by the first Black woman to serve in the Royal Navy, who disguised herself as a man.

 (TfL)
(TfL)

Embankment becomes Pablo Fanque, who inspired the Beatles song Being for the Benefit of Mr Kite!

Elm Park is renamed Joe Clough, who became London Transport’s first black bus driver.

Arike Oke, managing director, Black Cultural Archives said: “London’s Black history is deeply embedded in its streets and neighbourhoods.

Justin Fashanu (Getty Images)
Justin Fashanu (Getty Images)

“We’re delighted, as part of our 40th anniversary celebrations, to use this opportunity to share new and old stories about Black history with Londoners and visitors to London. We hope that the map will be an invitation to find out more and to explore.”

Andrea Levy (Getty Images)
Andrea Levy (Getty Images)

The names on the Tube lines have been chosen to represent different themes: firsts and trailblazers; Georgians; sports; arts; LGBTQ+; physicians; performers; literary world and community organisers.

Marcia Williams, TfL’s head of diversity, said: “Black people have played a significant role in all aspects of British life for thousands of years.

“From civil rights, art, and transport, to medicine and journalism. It is fantastic to see the true scale and breadth of this contribution commemorated on TfL’s iconic Tube map – a symbol so synonymous with London and the UK.”

Errol Brown (Getty Images)
Errol Brown (Getty Images)

The map can be viewed in full at www.tfl.gov.uk/Black-history-map and can be ordered via the London Transport Museum and Black Cultural Archives, in Brixton.

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