Three-time Tour de France winner Greg LeMond announces leukaemia diagnosis

  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
·1-min read
In this article:
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
 (AFP via Getty Images)
(AFP via Getty Images)

Greg LeMond, the American cyclist who claimed three Tour de France victories, has announced his diagnosis for leukaemia.

The 60-year-old released a statement on Monday revealing he had symptoms of fatigue before a check-up confirmed the “treatable” cancer.

“I have been diagnosed with chronic myelogenous leukaemia,” he said.

“Fortunately, it is a type of cancer that is treatable, and it is a type of leukaemia that is not life-threatening or debilitating. Following a series of tests and a bone marrow biopsy, which was completed last week, I received my formal diagnosis last Friday.

“No-one ever wants to hear the word cancer but, admittedly, there is great relief, now, to know why I was feeling poorly.”

LeMond won the Tour in 1986, 1989 and 1990 - and stands as the only American to win the historic race after Lance Armstrong and Floyd Landis were stripped of their crowns. LeMond has long been a strong anti-doping voice in the sport.

In between his first and second titles, he recovered from life-threatening injuries after being accidentally shot by a friend while on a turkey hunting trip in his native California.

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting