How to get tickets for Eurovision 2023 as Liverpool to host

How to get tickets for Eurovision 2023 as Liverpool to host

The UK will host Eurovision in 2023, as 2022 winners Ukraine are unable to host the song contest following Russia’s invasion.

Ukraine’s Kalush Orchestra won the song contest in May, while the UK’s Sam Ryder was the runner-up with his hit song Space Man.

Traditionally, Ukraine would be the next host, but due to the conflict in the country, the UK will step up to host instead.

Mykola Chernotytskyi, head of the managing board of the broadcaster, said in a statement: "The 2023 Eurovision Song Contest will not be in Ukraine but in support of Ukraine. We are grateful to our BBC partners for showing solidarity with us.

"I am confident that together we will be able to add Ukrainian spirit to this event and once again unite the whole of Europe around our common values of peace, support, celebrating diversity and talent."

UK fans of Eurovision will be wondering how they can get their hands on tickets, as its the first time they can attend the show without having to travel internationally since 1998.

Although tickets are not on sale just yet, find out eerythig we know about how to get Eurovision tickets below.

Where will Eurovision take place in 2023?

It has been revealed that Liverpool will play host to next year’s Eurovision Song Contest. The event will take place in the 11,000-capacity M&S Bank Arena.

The announcement that Liverpool beat Glasgow to host the competition was made by Graham Norton on the BBC’s One Show.

Birmingham hosted Eurovision in 1998 – the last time it took place in the UK – but it has also been hosted by London, Edinburgh, and Brighton.

How to throw the ultimate Eurovision party at home

Just follow these 8 easy steps...: (JONATHAN NACKSTRAND/AFP/Getty Images )
Just follow these 8 easy steps...: (JONATHAN NACKSTRAND/AFP/Getty Images )
Step 1: Set a dress code:
Step 1: Set a dress code:
Step 2: Flags, Flags and more Flags: Decorations are obviously a must, but you don’t have to worry, it’s pretty simple – flags! Flags on doors, walls, windows and even in your food and drinks. Any country that has a space in the grand final deserves a space in your house. (Bernard / imageBROKER/REX/Shutterstock)
Step 2: Flags, Flags and more Flags: Decorations are obviously a must, but you don’t have to worry, it’s pretty simple – flags! Flags on doors, walls, windows and even in your food and drinks. Any country that has a space in the grand final deserves a space in your house. (Bernard / imageBROKER/REX/Shutterstock)
Step 3: Swedish Drinks Only:
Step 3: Swedish Drinks Only:
Step 4: Play drinking Games: With all these drinks involved, of course there needs to be a Eurovision-themed drinking game? Take a ‘responsible’ sip every time you see or hear the following...an act wearing sunglasses on stage, when someone says ‘Sweden', there are dancers that have no relevance to the song - whatsoever, there is an act wearing practically nothing, someone is wearing tin foil - again, when the presenter shouts ‘Good Evening’ and finally, when a country's performance is unusually amusing. (Rex)
Step 4: Play drinking Games: With all these drinks involved, of course there needs to be a Eurovision-themed drinking game? Take a ‘responsible’ sip every time you see or hear the following...an act wearing sunglasses on stage, when someone says ‘Sweden', there are dancers that have no relevance to the song - whatsoever, there is an act wearing practically nothing, someone is wearing tin foil - again, when the presenter shouts ‘Good Evening’ and finally, when a country's performance is unusually amusing. (Rex)
Step 5: Party food:
Step 5: Party food:
Step 6: Do a sweepstake: While watching this gloriously tacky competition, why not engage in a little competition of your own? Organise a sweepstake amongst your guests, choosing one person per country and a pound to enter, with the jackpot as the prize. <p></p>You can print out the BBC's handy sweepstake kit from here: <a href=
Step 6: Do a sweepstake: While watching this gloriously tacky competition, why not engage in a little competition of your own? Organise a sweepstake amongst your guests, choosing one person per country and a pound to enter, with the jackpot as the prize. You can print out the BBC's handy sweepstake kit from here:

bbc.co.uk (BBC)" />

Step 7: Make a playlist: Create the ultimate playlist with Eurovision hits from over the years such as, Rise Like a Pheonix (Conchita), Waterloo (Abba), Flying the Flag (Schooch), Congratulations (Cliff Richard), Lipstick (Jedwood) and Just a little bit (Gina G). It's bound to get the party started and keep the mood up during any ad breaks. (Olle Lindeborg/AFP/Getty)
Step 7: Make a playlist: Create the ultimate playlist with Eurovision hits from over the years such as, Rise Like a Pheonix (Conchita), Waterloo (Abba), Flying the Flag (Schooch), Congratulations (Cliff Richard), Lipstick (Jedwood) and Just a little bit (Gina G). It's bound to get the party started and keep the mood up during any ad breaks. (Olle Lindeborg/AFP/Getty)
Step 8: Karaoke to end the night:
Step 8: Karaoke to end the night:

How to get tickets for Eurovision 2023?

Tickets for Eurovision 2022 went on sale on April 7, ahead of the first jury show on May 9. There were tickets available for nine shows, including the semi-finals and the grand final itself.

As this year’s show was hosted by Turin, tickets for the song contest were sold by Italian ticketing company Ticket One.

Therefore, we can expect tickets for the 2023 show will be sold by a UK-based ticketing platform. But this exact information has not yet been released.

Once organisers reveal when tickets will go on sale, Eurovision fans will likely be able to register for an account with the ticket sellers and will be able to sign up for notifications when they go on sale.

How much are tickets for Eurovision 2023?

Ticket prices for Eurovision 2022 varied depending on the show and the category.

Tickets for the Eurovision live final ranged from €150 to €350, while tickets for the family show (which took place earlier the same day) ranged from €40 to €150. Tickets for the jury shows and semi-finals ranged from €20 to €250.

Those buying tickets could only buy four per show, and they had to provide their name and personal details.

The names on the tickets could only be changed once and any reselling had to happen through an official platform, to prevent ticket scalpers from buying up the tickets to sell them on for profit.