Two quotes that show how badly Brexit talks are going

Nick Reilly
Contributor
The EU’s chief Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier (right), with his British counterpart David Davis, says there was no “decisive progress” in the latest round of talks (Picture: AFP)

As Britain moves forward with negotiations to leave the European Union, all eyes have been placed on Brexit secretary David Davis, who is tasked with the job of leading talks with chief EU negotiator Michel Barnier.

But despite Davis’ continued claims of making progress, it seems that both men *aren’t* quite on the same page.

During a press conference earlier today to discuss talks, this is what Davis said:

’There has been concrete progress in the talks’

We’ve made some “concrete” progress with the EU, David Davis says after Brexit talks https://t.co/PhQAOTENHQ pic.twitter.com/N4TiYglhtG

— Bloomberg (@business) 31 August 2017

A couple of minutes later, it was Mr Barnier’s turn to speak, during which he said:

’There has been no decisive progress on the key issues’

Michel Barnier says there was no decisive progress during the latest Brexit negotiations https://t.co/KEnLCwmhp9 pic.twitter.com/fgmQkeYHuL

— Bloomberg TV (@BloombergTV) 31 August 2017

For some, the divide between the two is proof that Britain is facing a rocky path as it prepares to exit the European Union.

‘An absolute unmitigated shambles’, one Twitter user wrote.

The press conference also saw Davis claiming Britain had a duty to ‘interrogate’ the EU demand of settling accounts beyond its exit in 2019.

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We have a very different legal stance but as we said in the Article 50 letter the settlement should be in accordance with EU law and in the spirit of UK’s continuing partnership with the EU,’ Davis said.

‘We are a country that meets its international obligations and will continue to do so, but those obligations have to be well specified and they have to be real. They don’t necessarily have to be legal. We also recognised moral obligations sometimes.’