The US has had at least 314 mass shootings so far in 2022. Here's the full list.

·3-min read
A stretcher is seen after a mass shooting at the Highland Park Fourth of July parade in downtown Highland Park, Ill.
A stretcher is seen after a mass shooting at the Highland Park Fourth of July parade in downtown Highland Park, Ill.AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh
  • The Gun Violence Archive has counted at least 314 mass shootings in the US so far in 2022.

  • More than 22,000 people have died due to gun violence overall in 2022, according to the Archive.

  • An expert told Insider it's difficult to predict whether this year will be deadlier than last year.

The United States is an unfortunate outlier.

As people across the country beg for gun reform —  families of gun violence victims testified before Congress last month for tightened gun control legislation — mass shootings keep on occurring, and at a frenetic pace.

Just over a week after President Joe Biden signed a bipartisan gun reform bill into law, six people were killed and more than 30 others were injured following a mass shooting during a US Independence Day parade in Highland Park, Illinois, on Monday. Authorities arrested a 22-year-old man, who was named a person of interest in connection to the incident, after a two-hour manhunt.

There were 13 mass shootings in the first weekend in June, fewer than two weeks after a gunman killed 19 students and two teachers at an elementary school in Uvalde, Texas, marking the deadliest school shooting since Sandy Hook Elementary School in 2012.

The Gun Violence Archive, a nonprofit that tracks shootings in the US, has recorded at least 314 mass shootings in 2022 so far. Gun violence overall has killed at least 22,000 people in the US this year so far, according to the Archive's records.

The United States has far more lax firearm laws and policies compared to other countries — the federal right to own a firearm is even baked into the Constitution via the Second Amendment. Gun laws and regulations also vary from state to state. Some states have more restrictive laws, while some allow for much greater firearm ownership rates for protection and hunting.

"In a country like ours ... we have a lot of guns,"  R. Thurman Barnes, the assistant director of Rutgers University's New Jersey Gun Violence Research Center and faculty at the Rutgers School of Public Health, told Insider. "And when you have as many guns as we have — which we have more guns than people — you're going to have more gun violence in all of its forms."

As a result, firearms have become one of the leading causes of death for Americans of any age, and, according to the Giffords Law Center, they're also the leading cause of death for children below the age of 18.

Different sources differ on the definition of a mass shooting, but the Gun Violence Archive and the Congressional Research Service define it as an incident where four or more people were shot, not counting the shooter as a victim.

This table includes the names, locations, and casualty information from each mass shooting the Gun Violence Archive has recorded in the US so far in 2022:

You can view a report of any shooting incident by visiting the list on the Gun Violence Archive's website.

Historically, mass shootings tend to happen in the latter half of the year

There have been slightly fewer mass shootings so far in 2022 than 2021

In 2021, the Gun Violence Archive recorded 692 mass shootings and found that gun violence overall killed 45,010 people.

Barnes told Insider that it's difficult to know if there will be more mass shootings in 2022 compared to last year.

"I think what we can say is whatever number we settle on this year, we probably won't be far off to where we've been in the previous year. We're in June; we're north of 220-something mass shootings," Barnes said. "It's my prayer that we don't reach the 600-plus that we had the previous year."

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