British people are confused about where political parties stand on Brexit, poll reveals

·Contributor
Anti-Brexit protestors joined forces with Extinction Rebellion in Berkeley Square where hundreds of people had gathered to sing a song from 1939 called ‘A nightingale sang in Berkeley Square’.
The public are confused by where political parties stand on Brexit, a YouGov poll claims. (PA)

British people have been left baffled by Brexit, a poll has revealed.

The latest figures from YouGov appear to confirm that the Great British public aren’t entirely sure on where political parties stand on the debate.

With the process now in limbo after Theresa May secured an extension of Article 50 until October 31 the poll asked 1,730 adults which parties are anti-Brexit.

And the results are...surprising.

Prime Minister Theresa May during a visit to the Leisure Box in Brierfield, Lancashire, while on the local elections campaign.
Prime Minister Theresa May is just one of the reasons voters are confused by where political parties stand on Brexit

The party most commonly associated by voters with an anti-Brexit policy was the SNP with 65% of people aligning them, following by the Lib Dems with 53% of those polled being aware of the stance.

Despite forming with an anti-Brexit agenda just 38% of people were aware of their stance.

But it is the big two parties which have voters most baffled - 42% of the electorate thinks Labour are anti-Brexit, followed by 24% of people believing the Tories are opposed to Britain’s departure from the European Union.

Just over one in 10 people (13%) see Labour as anti-Brexit while 20% of Britons think neither Labour nor the Tories have an opinion on leaving the EU.

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn poses for a selfie with Lucinda Robinson, Shaz Nawaz and Katia Yurgutene during campaigning in Peterborough ahead of next week's local elections.
Jeremy Corbyn is under increasing pressure to back calls for a second referendum.
Leader of the Brexit Party Nigel Farage with former Tory minister Ann Widdecombe, who has defected from the Conservatives to join the Brexit Party, in Westminster, London.
Leader of the Brexit Party Nigel Farage with former Tory minister Ann Widdecombe, who has defected from the Conservatives to join the Brexit Party, in Westminster, London.

Unsurprisingly the Brexit Party was correctly identified as being pro-Brexit byt 79% of people, with Ukip coming in second with 71% of people spotting their anti-EU stance.

The confusion is not helped by the growing pressures on Jeremy Corbyn as the party comes under pressure to shift Labour's stance on a second Brexit referendum, as the party's ruling body met to finalise its manifesto for next month's European elections.

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Ahead of Tuesday's meeting of the National Executive Committee, large numbers of Labour MPs and candidates and leaders of major unions called for the party to back a referendum on any Brexit deal.

But senior figures within the party are resisting such a move, insisting Labour should stick to promising a public vote to avoid a "damaging Tory Brexit" or crashing out without a deal.

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