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Criterion Channel Unveils April 2024 Streaming Lineup, Including William Friedkin and Kristen Stewart Collections

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Cinephiles will have plenty to celebrate this April with the next slate of additions to the Criterion Channel. The boutique distributor, which recently announced its June 2024 Blu-ray releases, has unveiled its new streaming lineup highlighted by an eclectic mix of classic films and modern arthouse hits.

Students of Hollywood history will be treated to the “Peak Noir: 1950” collection, which features 17 noir films from the landmark film year from directors including Billy Wilder, Alfred Hitchcock, and John Huston.

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New Hollywood maverick William Friedkin will also be celebrated when five of his most beloved movies, including “Sorcerer” and “The Exorcist,” come to the channel in April.

Criterion will offer the streaming premiere of Wim Wenders’ 3D art documentary “Anselm,” which will be accompanied by the “Wim Wenders’ Adventures in Moviegoing” collection, which sees the director curating a selection of films from around the world that have influenced his careers.

Contemporary cinema is also well represented, with collections such as “Three Starring Kristen Stewart” (which includes “Personal Shopper,” “Certain Women,” and “Clouds of Sils Maria”) highlighting some of the arthouse world’s current biggest names.

Keep reading for a complete list of films coming to the Criterion Channel in April 2024. Titles marked with an asterisk are not available outside the United States.

“5 Centimeters per Second,” Makoto Shinkai, 2007

“After Hours,” Martin Scorsese, 1985

“Alix’s Pictures,” Jean Eustache, 1980

“All the Days of May,” Miryam Charles, 2023

“The Asphalt Jungle,” John Huston, 1950*

“An Autumn’s Tale,” Mabel Cheung, 1987

“As If No Misfortune Had Occurred in the Night,” Søren Lind and Larissa Sansour, 2022

“Assault on Precinct 13,” John Carpenter, 1976

“Bad Lieutenant,” Abel Ferrara, 1992

“Before Sunrise,” Richard Linklater, 1995

“Born in Flames,” Lizzie Borden, 1983

“Born to Be Bad,” Nicholas Ray, 1950

“The Breaking Point,” Michael Curtiz, 1950

“Caged,” John Cromwell, 1950

“Children Who Chase Lost Voices,” Makoto Shinkai, 2011

“Collateral,” Michael Mann, 2004*

“Come Back, Africa,” Lionel Rogosin, 1959

“Comrades: Almost a Love Story,” Peter Ho-sun Chan, 1996

“The Damned Don’t Cry,” Vincent Sherman, 1950

“Deal of the Century,” William Friedkin, 1983

“A Dirty Story”, Jean Eustache, 1977

“Doors of the Past,” Rosine Mbakam, 2011

“Employment Offer,” Jean Eustache, 1982

“The Exorcist,” William Friedkin, 1973

“Exterior Turbulence,” Sofia Theodore-Pierce, 2023

“Family Nest,” Béla Tarr, 1979

“Farewell China”, Clara Law, 1990

“The File on Thelma Jordon,” Robert Siodmak, 1950*

“Full Moon in New York,” Stanley Kwan, 1989

“The Garden of Words,” Makoto Shinkai, 2013

“Gun Crazy,” Joseph H. Lewis, 1950

“Heat,” Michael Mann, 1995

“Hieronymus Bosch’s Garden of Delights,” Jean Eustache, 1981

“House of Pleasures,” Bertrand Bonello, 2011

“In a Lonely Place,” Nicholas Ray, 1950

“L’escale,” Paul Shemisi, Nizar Saleh, Rob Jacobs, and Anne Reijniers, 2022

“Lush: A Far from Home Movie,” Phil King, 2024

“Mambar Pierrette,” Rosine Mbakam, 2023

“Maurice Hines: Bring Them Back,” John Carluccio, 2019

“Microcosmos,” Claude Nuridsany and Marie Pérennou, 1996

“Mommie Dearest,” Frank Perry, 1981

“The Mother and the Whore,” Jean Eustache, 1973

“A Movement Against the Transparency of the Stars of the Seas,” Esy Casey, 2023

“My Little Loves,” Jean Eustache, 1974

“Night and the City,” Jules Dassin, 1950

“No Way Out,” Joseph L. Mankiewicz, 1950

“Nocturama,” Bertrand Bonello, 2016

“Numéro zéro,” Jean Eustache, 1971

“One Way Street,” Hugo Fregonese, 1950*

“Oslo, August 31st,” Joachim Trier, 2011*

“Panic in the Streets,” Elia Kazan, 1950

“Party on the CAPS,” Meriem Bennani, 2018

“Personal Shopper,” Olivier Assayas, 2016

“Phase IV,” Saul Bass, 1974

“Pier Paolo Pasolini – Agnès Varda – New York – 1967,” Agnès Varda, 2022

“The Pig,” Jean Eustache, 1975

“The Place Promised in Our Early Days,” Makoto Shinkai, 2004

“Promised Lands,” Emma Wolukau-Wanambwa, 2018

“Regrouping,” Lizzie Borden, 1976

“Robinson’s Place,” Jean Eustache, 1963

“Running Scared,” Wayne Kramer, 2006

“Santa Claus Has Blue Eyes,” Jean Eustache, 1966

“She and Her Cat,” Makoto Shinkai, 1999

“The Sleeping City,” George Sherman, 1950*

“Sorcerer,” William Friedkin, 1977

“Stage Fright,” Alfred Hitchcock, 1950

“The Strangler,” Paul Vecchiali, 1970

“Sunset Boulevard,” Billy Wilder, 1950

“The Taking,” Alexandre O. Philippe, 2021

“Them!,” Gordon Douglas, 1954

“Theta,” Lawrence Lek, 2022

“Try and Get Me!,” Cy Endfield, 1950

“The Virgin of Pessac,” Jean Eustache, 1969

“The Virgin of Pessac 79,” Jean Eustache, 1979

“A Visual Diary,” Shirley Clarke, 1980

“Voices of a Distant Star,” Makoto Shinkai, 2002

“Werckmeister Harmonies,” Béla Tarr and Ágnes Hranitzky, 2000

“Where the Sidewalk Ends,” Otto Preminger, 1950

“The Witches of the Orient,” Julien Faraut, 2021

“Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?,” Mike Nichols, 1966

“Yaangna Plays Itself,” Adam Piron, 2022

“You Will Be My Ally,” Rosine Mbakam, 2012

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