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David Attenborough's first trailer for Wild Isles shows stunning UK scenes

Watch: David Attenborough gives a first look at UK nature documentary Wild Isles

Sir David Attenborough's new UK based nature documentary Wild Isles is set to show off some hidden gems on our doorsteps – with incredible scenes featured in the first trailer.

The naturalist has spent decades travelling to far-flung locations to bring viewers footage of wildlife and nature on other continents, but his new series will showcase some of the overlooked areas close to home.

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BBC One's Wild Isles will cover the forests, coasts and mountains of the UK, and its trailer shows creatures every bit as fascinating as those featured in any of his other documentaries.

Sir David Attenborough will present a new nature series about the UK. (BBC)
Sir David Attenborough will present a new nature series about the UK. (BBC)

In the trailer's voiceover, Attenborough says: "Welcome to a place that is astonishing.

"Nature in these islands, if you know where to look, can be extraordinary, dramatic and beautiful.

"It rivals anything I've seen elsewhere. It's not far...it's home."

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Scenes featured include jellyfish, porpoises, birds of prey, horses, badgers and red squirrels, as well as sweeping views of dense forests and snow-covered mountain ranges.

Attenborough can be seen sitting on some rocks, inches away from puffins who are catching fish.

A puffin at Skomer Island off the Pembrokeshire coast in Wales. (BBC)
A puffin at Skomer Island off the Pembrokeshire coast in Wales. (BBC)

Speaking to The Daily Telegraph magazine recently about Wild Isles, Attenborough recalled how early on in his career he made an agreement with the BBC to focus on global wildlife while the corporation’s Natural History Unit, founded in Bristol in 1957, would produce stories on Britain.

He said: “There was a chap trying to establish Bristol then as a centre of natural history. He knew which strings to pull and I could see things coming to a head.

Viewers will see the nature on their doorsteps. (BBC)
Viewers will see the nature on their doorsteps. (BBC)

“Eventually we had a meeting and it was agreed I wouldn’t look at British natural history at all.

“Instead, I would go to Africa, South America and so on, and (they) could deal with natural history in Britain. I stuck to that until very recently.”

Reflecting on that agreement, he admitted: “If there is one thing I regret, and to be honest there isn’t a lot, it would be that I spent so much time doing overseas natural history.”