Death of Queen Elizabeth latest: First members of the public pay their respects at St Giles’ Cathedral

·54-min read

The first members of the public are visiting St Giles’ Cathedral to view the Queen’s coffin on Monday evening.

People have waited hours to pay their respects to Queen Elizabeth II’s coffin as it stays in the Scottish capital for 24 hours before it is taken to London.

First Minister Nicola Sturgeon led tributes to the Queen at the Scottish Parliament just moments earlier.

It followed a service of thanksgiving for Her Majesty the Queen at St Giles’ Cathedral in Edinburgh after King Charles led a procession behind his mother’s coffin.

King Charles III held audience with Scotland’s First Minister Nicola Sturgeon and met with politicians at the Scottish Parliament before receiving a motion of condolence.

The King responded: “I take up my new duties with thankfulness for all that Scotland has given me. With resolve to seek always the welfare of our country and its people and with wholehearted trust in your goodwill and good counsel as we take forward that task together.”

On Monday night, the King and Queen Consort, Duke of York, Earl of Wessex and Princess Royal led a vigil for their mother in the Scottish capital at around 7.20pm.

What is happening today

06:56 , Sarah Harvey

King Charles III and the Queen Consort are to visit Westminster Hall in London where both Houses of Parliament will express condolences to the new monarch.

Later on Monday, Charles and Camilla will fly to Edinburgh where they will attend a Ceremony of the Keys and the King will inspect the guard of honour.

Charles will then lead the royal family in procession as the Queen’s coffin is taken from the Palace of Holyroodhouse to nearby St Giles’ Cathedral for a service of thanksgiving.

Members of the public will be able to view the coffin at the cathedral and pay their respects from 5pm for a period of 24 hours.

The King will then hold audiences with First Minister Nicola Sturgeon and Alison Johnstone, the Presiding Officer of the Scottish Parliament.

Later in the evening, the King and other members of the royal family will mount a vigil at the cathedral in honour of their mother.

Australian Prime Minister slammed over 'short notice’ bank holiday

07:01 , Will Mata

The Australian Prime Minister has faced backlash from the business and health care sector following the announcement of a one-off bank holiday to mark a national day of mourning for the late Queen (ABC/AP) (AP)
The Australian Prime Minister has faced backlash from the business and health care sector following the announcement of a one-off bank holiday to mark a national day of mourning for the late Queen (ABC/AP) (AP)

The Australian Prime Minister has faced backlash from the business and health care sector following the announcement of a one-off bank holiday to mark a national day of mourning for the late Queen.

Anthony Albanese announced on Sunday that Australia will observe a bank holiday on September 22 following the monarch's funeral on September 19.

The news quickly drew criticism from healthcare professionals who say the short-notice nature of the bank holiday will cause huge disruption to their sector where consultations and operations are arranged weeks and sometimes months in advance.

The Australia Medical Association president Steve Robson tweeted: "Operations and lots of patient consultations booked that day, at a time when access is difficult. Thanks for dropping this at short notice."

Royal chaplain shares her memories

07:06 , Will Mata

The late monarch’s lying in state in Westminster Hall opens to the public at 5pm on Wednesday (Steve Parsons/PA) (PA Wire)
The late monarch’s lying in state in Westminster Hall opens to the public at 5pm on Wednesday (Steve Parsons/PA) (PA Wire)

A former royal chaplain shared her memories of looking at the Queen's family holiday photos on a visit to Balmoral.

The very Reverend Dr Lorna Hood was moderator of the general assembly of the Church of Scotland between 2013-14.

On a visit to Balmoral, Dr Hood recalled a younger member of the extended family's disappointment his sword was "just pretend" after attending a ceremonial event.

Dr Hood said that the Queen "immediately stopped eating" and "feigned surprise".

The Queen said: "But how will you protect me?"

Dr Hood added: "He hadn't thought of that and for a few seconds was quite concerned then burst out laughing with the Queen and the rest of the table."

Charles, an ‘open and informal monarch’

07:15 , Will Mata

King Charles III during a reception with Realm High Commissioners and their spouses in the Bow Room at Buckingham Palace (Victoria Jones/PA) (PA Wire)
King Charles III during a reception with Realm High Commissioners and their spouses in the Bow Room at Buckingham Palace (Victoria Jones/PA) (PA Wire)

King Charles has already been credited as an ‘open and informal monarch, with kisses from members of the public and an ease with speaking from the heart’.

Catherine Wylie, a PA royal correspondant, wrote that: “Charles has always looked comfortable during a walkabout, chatting to people with a story to tell or those simply eager to meet a prince and heir to the throne.

“Now the man who has been a king-in-waiting for decades will be keen to settle into his reign and make the role his own.

“There are already signs that Charles's style will be one that focuses on interaction with the public and does not shy away from emotion.

“Since the Queen's death on Thursday, he has greeted well-wishers on a walkabout outside Buckingham Palace on two occasions - on his arrival at the palace on Friday with the Queen Consort, and then again on Saturday evening.

“Friday's walkabout was his first encounter with the public as their King and crowds were delighted to see the new monarch in the flesh.

“One woman leaned over to kiss Charles's right hand and another kissed him on the cheek as he thanked people for their good wishes, shaking countless hands after stepping out of his vehicle in front of the palace.

“The King's address to the nation, televised on Friday evening, saw Charles reflect lovingly on his "darling mama".

“The speech moved viewers, with people describing it as "heartfelt" and "personal", while his mention of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex was met with approval.”

What are the duties and powers of Charles III as King?

07:24 , Will Mata

Charles’s style is set to be one that focuses on interaction with the public (PA) (PA Wire)
Charles’s style is set to be one that focuses on interaction with the public (PA) (PA Wire)

The King is a constitutional monarch who must remain politically neutral.

The head of state has "an important formal and ceremonial relationship" with Parliament, the monarchy's official website says.

Charles's role will consist, as did the late Queen's, of assenting to Bills passed by Parliament on the advice of ministers.

He will also give audiences to ministers, at which he may be "consulted, encourage and warn", and summon new Parliaments on the Government's advice, and open and close - or prorogue - each session of Parliament.

His assent is required to all bills passed by Parliament in order for them to become law. Royal Assent has not been refused since 1707.

It is also a long established convention that the monarch is asked for consent to debate bills which would affect the prerogative or interests of the Crown.

Research by The Guardian in 2021 found more than 1,000 laws had been vetted by Elizabeth II - including whether national traffic rules applied to her private estates of Balmoral and Sandringham.

In the annual State Opening of Parliament ceremony, the King will open Parliament in person, and deliver the King's Speech.

It will also be Charles's duty to appoint any future prime ministers - one of the few remaining personal prerogatives of the sovereign.

The monarch does not act on advice nor need to consult anyone before calling upon the leader with an overall majority of seats in the House of Commons to form a government.

It was one of the Queen's last ever duties, just two days before she died, when she appointed Liz Truss as PM at Balmoral Castle.

King to use Clarence House while Buckingham Palace is refurbished

07:29 , Will Mata

 (PA)
(PA)

The King will use Clarence House as his home for the time being, with major building work at Buckingham Palace yet to be completed.

Buckingham Palace is considered Monarchy HQ and Charles III has already held a series of audiences with the PM, cabinet ministers and Realm High Commissioners at the famous London landmark.

The £369 million reservicing programme at the historic building is spanning 10 years, and includes updating the electrical cabling, plumbing and heating.

It is understood the King and the Queen Consort will use nearby Clarence House - the Queen Mother's former home which Charles moved into in 2003, as their home at this stage while focused on the aftermath of the Queen's death, with the Palace reserved for official duties.

Clarence House, built between 1825 and 1827 to the designs of John Nash, is much loved by the couple, and was extensively refurbished and redecorated to the their taste, and features pieces from Charles's art collection and many family photos around the residence.

Buckingham Palace has served as the official London residence of the UK's sovereigns since 1837.

It has 775 rooms, including 19 state rooms, 52 royal and guest bedrooms, 188 staff bedrooms, 92 offices and 78 bathrooms.

Graffiti artist ‘honoured and emotional’ to have painted Queen

07:36 , Will Mata

 (PA)
(PA)

A graffiti artist has said he is "honoured and emotional" to have painted a permanent tribute of the Queen at a pub named after the late monarch.

Scott Wilcock, 35, who works under the name Snow Graffiti, created a mural with the words "thanks for everything ma'am" on a wall at the Queens Arms pub in Audenshaw, Manchester.

Mr Wilcock told the PA news agency: "I don't normally work on weekends but when the pub contacted me about doing a tribute to the Queen, I just thought it was such an amazing idea.

"I've done hundreds of murals but this one was especially emotional and I felt honoured to have been asked to do it.

"All through the day I had people coming over to talk to me and take photos while I was working, one woman even started crying."

The 35-year-old artist, who lives in Wigan, was approached by the family-owned pub after one of the owners spotted a previous mural he had done titled 'Football Icons' for a pub in Prestwich.

To create the mural, Mr Wilcock projected an image of the Queen onto a blank white wall and mapped out an outline, including the eyes and mouth.

He then set to work from 7am on Saturday morning airbrushing the portrait, and it took him a day to complete the artwork.

What is meant by lying in state?

07:44 , Will Mata

Officials expect queues to see the Queen’s lying in state could last 12 hours and stretch for miles as rail firms warn trains will be ‘extremely busy’ (Zac Goodwin/PA) (PA Wire)
Officials expect queues to see the Queen’s lying in state could last 12 hours and stretch for miles as rail firms warn trains will be ‘extremely busy’ (Zac Goodwin/PA) (PA Wire)

Lying in state is usually reserved for sovereigns, current or past queen consorts, and sometimes former prime ministers.

During the formal occasion, the closed coffin is placed on view, as thousands of people queue to file past and pay their respects.

The late monarch's lying in state in Westminster Hall opens to the public at 5pm on Wednesday and it will be open 24 hours a day until it closes at 6.30am on Monday September 19 - the day of the Queen's funeral.

Westminster Hall, which dates back to 1099, is in the Palace of Westminster and is the oldest building on the Parliamentary estate.

Scottish Conservative leader pays respect

07:46 , Will Mata

Scottish Conservative Leader Douglas Ross (Lesley Martin/PA) (PA Wire)
Scottish Conservative Leader Douglas Ross (Lesley Martin/PA) (PA Wire)

Scottish Tory leader Douglas Ross said "the Queen loved Scotland and Scotland loved the Queen".

He said the strength of the connection between Scotland and the royal family was evident as people lined up to pay their respects as the Queen's cortege passed through the nation on Sunday.

Asked if the connection is still there with the new King, Mr Ross told BBC Radio 4's Today programme: "Yes, and I think particularly with the Accession Council making the point that the new King swore his allegiance to uphold and protect the Church of Scotland, the fact that the royal family are here today and there'll be a service of thanksgiving at St Giles', and then in the Scottish Parliament we will also be paying tribute to the late Queen and also pledging our allegiance and support to the new King and providing that support."

Armed forces have ‘special bond with monarch’

07:49 , Will Mata

Lord Dannatt believes the Russians ‘will not get an easy ride’ if they invade Ukraine (Kirsty O’Connor/PA) (PA Archive)
Lord Dannatt believes the Russians ‘will not get an easy ride’ if they invade Ukraine (Kirsty O’Connor/PA) (PA Archive)

Former head of the British Army Lord Dannatt said the armed forces have a "special bond" with their monarch.

Asked how the accession of new sovereign affects the military, he told Sky News: "Well, it has impact on all of us in the country, but I think it has a particular impact on members of the armed forces.

"Much has been made of the fact that when we join the Army, Navy, Air Force, whatever, we sign, we swear an oath of allegiance.

"Seamlessly, when the Queen breathed her last last Thursday, our allegiance as soldiers of the Queen, we immediately became soldiers of the King. And that's a very special link that the military have.

"We carry out operations at risk of life and limb not in the name of the Government or the Prime Minister or the Secretary of State for Defence. We do it in the name of the sovereign, and the people of this country.

"That's a very special link, a very special bond. Actually, I think it makes the British armed forces themselves pretty special as a result."

Tube problems

08:05 , Will Mata

Mosaic tiles on the walls of Green Park underground station, London. (PA Archive)
Mosaic tiles on the walls of Green Park underground station, London. (PA Archive)

Londoners getting around may experience delays on lines into Green Park - near to Buckingham Palace - because of Tube problems.

Transport for London said power supply problems mean there is no Piccadilly line service between Hyde Park Corner and Cockfosters.

There are "severe delays" on the rest of the line.

It has also been reported that the Victoria line is suspended because of power supply problems, with several stations closed.

Londoners could face 12-hour wait to see monarch lying in state

08:09 , Will Mata

Officials expect queues to see the Queen's lying in state could last 12 hours and stretch for miles as rail firms warn trains will be "extremely busy".

Whitehall chiefs in charge of logistics for the historic five-night vigil have estimated mourner numbers could be close to that which turned up to view Pope John Paul II, according to The Sun.

A million mourners filed past the late pope when he lay in state in Rome in 2005.

Buckingham Palace (Kirsty O’Connor/PA) (PA Wire)
Buckingham Palace (Kirsty O’Connor/PA) (PA Wire)

While Westminster Hall will be open 24 hours a day for four days for crowds to view the Queen's coffin, "insiders" reportedly told the paper people may have to wait up to 12 hours in a three-mile-long queue.

The Rail Delivery Group has meanwhile warned those wanting to travel to Westminster Hall to expect services to London and all of its stations to be "extremely busy".

The rail operator's customer information director told the BBC people needed to plan carefully and allow plenty of time if planning to travel during the official mourning place,

What we know, so far...

08:14 , Neil Hunter

 (PA Wire)
(PA Wire)

Some of the headlines from Monday morning:

- King Charles to lead royal family in procession behind Queen’s coffin

- Princess of Wales reveals Prince Louis’ touching words after Queen’s death

- Londoners warned they may queue for 12 hours to see the Queen

- Royal Proclamations ring out across the country for King Charles III

- Prince Andrew and Sarah, Duchess of York to take on Queen’s corgis

- Royal food and drink: What the Queen most often ate and drank

Lib Dem leader says parliament occasion a moment of ‘great sadness’

08:43 , Will Mata

Liberal Democrat Leader Sir Ed Davey (PA Wire)
Liberal Democrat Leader Sir Ed Davey (PA Wire)

Lib Dem leader Sir Ed Davey said the King's appearance in Parliament on Monday will be a moment of "reflection" and "great sadness".

Charles and the Queen Consort will visit Westminster Hall where both Houses of Parliament will express their condolences to the new monarch and his wife, and the King will give his reply.

"It's a part of Westminster which is resplendent with history," Sir Ed told Sky News.

"I think we'll all be very proud - proud of our country, proud of our amazing monarchy.

"But it will also be a moment of reflection, as you said, and a moment of great sadness."

Large crowds expected in Edinburgh

08:47 , Will Mata

Edinburgh City Council leader Cammy Day told BBC Radio Scotland's Good Morning Scotland programme the city was expecting large crowds on Monday.

He said: "We're expecting tens of thousands of people to be up and down the High Street as Her Majesty comes up to St Giles' and then onwards from there tomorrow.

"Our advice to people is to get to the city centre as quickly and early as you can, use public transport because the city has diversions or road closures.

"We are looking forward to welcoming tens of thousands of people to give Her Majesty the send off that the city will give her."

He said the queue from St Giles' Cathedral could potentially spiral back as far as The Meadows as people wait to pay their respects.

Scottish parliament presiding officer ‘will welcome King and Queen Consort’

08:50 , Will Mata

Alison Johnstone, the Scottish Parliament's presiding officer, told BBC Radio 4's Today programme, she would welcome the King and Queen Consort to Holyrood after 5pm.

She said the Parliament "will come together to express through a motion of condolence our deepest condolences to His Majesty the King and to the royal family."

She added: "I think it's absolutely clear from the contributions that we've been hearing on your programme already this morning that the people of Scotland very much wished to pay tribute for the the life of Her Majesty the Queen.

The Presiding Officer (PA Wire)
The Presiding Officer (PA Wire)

"The tone will be respectful. This afternoon gives us an opportunity to reflect on the life of Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth, to pay gratitude for that life and to ensure that the royal family have the support... the heartfelt sympathies of the Scottish people."

She said the setting of the Royal Mile "is quite spectacular" and "will enable people to be in very close proximity to the family as they head up the Royal Mile to St Giles'... so I have no doubt it will be a very emotional day indeed."

Replica of Queen created using at least 200 pieces of tape

08:56 , Will Mata

A Canadian student has created a replica of the Queen using “at least a couple of hundred” pieces of tape, which has gone viral and been labelled “the best tribute ever” by followers.

Matt Palandra, who is known as themagicmatt on TikTok, Instagram and YouTube and is a computer engineering student at the University of Toronto, spent seven hours creating an A4 image of the Queen after her death on Thursday.

The artwork was the result of a request from his followers, and reflects the late monarch’s face when a light is shone behind it.

Matt Palandra’s tape art before and after it is put in the light (themagicmatt/PA) (PA)
Matt Palandra’s tape art before and after it is put in the light (themagicmatt/PA) (PA)

“Literally minutes after the royal family posted [that the Queen has died], I had at least 20 comments instantly asking me if I could please make a tribute to the Queen,” the 19-year-old said.

“I tried to make one that was tasteful and to the best of my ability because I love creating content for my followers and want to deliver.”

He added that he did not expect the art to take seven hours to complete but he wanted to “make it right”.

Advice to leave extra time for Queen visit

09:18 , Will Mata

People travelling to Edinburgh to pay their respects to the Queen are being urged to leave extra time as the city prepares to welcome tens of thousands of people.

Several roads are closed and the city council has warned of significant disruption as ceremonial events take place in the Old Town area on Monday.

Two primary schools and an Early Years Centre in that part of the city have been closed on Monday.

The Queen’s coffin will be taken from the Palace of Holyroodhouse to St Giles’ Cathedral later in the day, followed by a procession of royal family members led by King Charles III.

Infrastructure set up for miles of people queuing

09:20 , Will Mata

Infrastructure has been set up in preparation for miles of people queuing for the Queen's lying in state in Westminster Hall.

From 9am on Tuesday, private security staff and stewards in hi-vis vests and Metropolitan Police officers are stationed along the route, where people will be able to queue from 5pm on Wednesday to see the late monarch’s coffin.

It stretches from Parliament’s tourist entrance, Cromwell Green, down Millbank, past the Lords and Victoria Tower Gardens, across Lambeth Bridge and loops back north on the other side of the River Thames.

 (PA)
(PA)

Portaloos and crowd control infrastructure like barriers and flooring have been now set up in to Victoria Tower Gardens.

Full details of the route will be published at 10pm on Tuesday.

Infrastructure has been set up in preparation for miles of people queuing for the Queen’s lying in state in Westminster Hall.

‘Crowds expected to swell’

09:21 , Will Mata

They said the queue is likely to snake for miles, all the way along the southside of the River Thames to Tower Bridge.

People will not be allowed to camp and will be given numbered wristbands to indicate their place in the queue so they are able to leave and come back, it is understood.

As of 9am on Tuesday, pedestrians have been walking freely up and down the route but it still appears fairly empty of people arriving early to queue.

Security staff manning the queue route to Westminster Hall for the Queen’s lying in state told the PA news agency that crowds are expected to swell ahead of Wednesday afternoon.

Pictured: Crowds begin to form outside Buckingham Palace

09:28 , Will Mata

 (AFP via Getty Images)
(AFP via Getty Images)

What the Queen liked to eat and drink

09:42 , Will Mata

Like with much of her life, the Queen had fine taste when it came to food and drink. As our article explores, Her Majesty enjoyed a class of Champagne, but was partial to lower-budget staples such as Special K cereal, and also had a fondness for salmon.

Here she is toasting an occasion with then-US president Ronald Reagan.

 (Getty Images)
(Getty Images)

New Zealand PM Jacinda Ardern says no republic plan following queen’s death

09:45 , Will Mata

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has said her government will not pursue any moves toward changing New Zealand to a republic following the death of Queen Elizabeth II.

Ms Ardern said she thought New Zealand would eventually become a republic, and it would probably happen within her lifetime, but that there were more pressing issues for her government to pursue.

Read our full article here.

 (AP)
(AP)

King Charles III: A highlight from Sunday

09:49 , Will Mata

This article, from the Evening Standard on Sunday:

A day of ceremony and history in the making had one unforeseen moment for the new King – when he found an item on a table stopping him from signing documents.

Charles is known to carry his own fountain pen for when he is frequently called on to sign visitors’ books during royal visits.

So when he sat down during his first Privy Council meeting to sign documents, he gestured for an ornate pen holder to be taken away by an aide.

Later it was back in place, after privy councillors used its pens to sign documents, but Charles once again took offence to the item, when called upon to give his signature, and pulled a face before it was removed again.

Prince Harry thanks his ‘granny’ in first full tribute since Queen’s death

09:52 , Will Mata

Prince Harry has paid a heartfelt tribute to his “granny” in his first words since the death of the Queen.

Harry and wife Meghan put on a united front with Prince William, the new Prince of Wales, and his wife Kate, the new Princess of Wales, on Saturday, speaking to well wishers at Windsor Castle.

Read the full story, here.

Stone of Destiny

09:59 , Will Mata

The Stone of Destiny, which was returned to Scotland in 1996, will be moved to London for the coronation of King Charles III (PA)
The Stone of Destiny, which was returned to Scotland in 1996, will be moved to London for the coronation of King Charles III (PA)

The Stone of Destiny will be moved from Edinburgh Castle to London for the coronation of the new King, it has been confirmed.

When Elizabeth II was crowned in 1953 at Westminster Abbey, her throne sat above the stone.

Read the full article, here.

Westminster Hall address: Guests begin to assemble

10:03 , Will Mata

Guests assembled in Westminster Hall ahead of an address by the King.

MPs and peers were among those seated under the cavernous timber roof of the ancient building.

Two empty thrones were placed at the head of the chamber, as the band of the Household Cavalry played sombre music in the archway behind.

Britain's Prime Minister Liz Truss arrives to attend the presentation of Addresses by both Houses of Parliament in Westminster Hall (POOL/AFP via Getty Images)
Britain's Prime Minister Liz Truss arrives to attend the presentation of Addresses by both Houses of Parliament in Westminster Hall (POOL/AFP via Getty Images)

Queen arrangements ‘massive challenge’ for police

10:05 , Will Mata

Sir Mark Rowley at New Scotland Yard in central London, where he starts his first day as Metropolitan Police Commissioner (PA)
Sir Mark Rowley at New Scotland Yard in central London, where he starts his first day as Metropolitan Police Commissioner (PA)

New Metropolitan Police Commissioner Sir Mark Rowley told Sky News of preparations for the Queen's lying in state: "It's a massive challenge for the Metropolitan Police and for me personally, but we have been preparing for many, many years.

"There are some very diligent and determined people who have put a lot of effort into this, and indeed myself in my previous roles in the Metropolitan Police - five or six years ago I was involved in some of that planning and I have been involved in a review recently.

"But most of all I have a lot of trust and confidence in the fantastic police officers who are going to support this event and help make it safe.

"They have been working with colleagues from across Government and the Royal Household and others, as you would expect.

"We will have a safe event but we will be putting thousands of officers into this because of the level of security required and the millions of people who want to pay their respects."

Preparations for arrival of King

10:18 , Will Mata

 (PA)
(PA)

The state trumpeters of the Household Cavalry took their post on the south window balcony of Westminster Hall to mark the beginning of the ceremony.

The King's Body Guard of the Yeomen of the Guard and the Honourable Corps of Gentleman at Arms then processed into Westminster Hall from the north door to take up their position.

The Lord Speaker's Procession and the Commons Speaker's Procession are to enter by the east door ahead of the arrival of the King and Queen Consort.

King arrives

10:21 , Sarah Harvey

King Charles III has got out of his car alongside the Queen Consort.

He is due to give his Westminster address shortly.

Pictured: King arrives at Westminster

10:23 , Will Mata

 (Getty Images)
(Getty Images)

Opening speech

10:30 , Will Mata

Lord McFall of Alcluith, speaking on behalf of the House of Lords, said: “Our late Majesty’s joyous unstinting and reassuring presence across the years made it difficult to contemplate that type of long and inspiring reign of deep and unparalleled devotion would ever end.”

Pictured: King Charles inside Westminster Hall

10:31 , Will Mata

King Charles (AP)
King Charles (AP)

Lindsay Hoyle, House of Commons speaker

10:35 , Will Mata

The speaker of the House of Commons is now on the microphone.

“We know you will bear the responsibilities,” he tells King Charles III.

“We express both our sorrow and our confidence in your reign.

Charles about to speak...

10:35 , Will Mata

The King has taken to the microphone

The King’s speech begins

10:38 , Will Mata

“I cannot help but feel the weight of history that reminds us of parliamentary traditions,” the King begins - addressing government leaders.

 (POOL/AFP via Getty Images)
(POOL/AFP via Getty Images)

Charles: ‘She kept unsurpassed devotion'

10:41 , Will Mata

“We gather in remembrance of the Queen’s remarkable span of service.

“While very young her late Majesty pledged herself to her country and her people.

“This vow, she kept with unsurpassed devotion. She set an example of selfless duty which with God’s help I have resolved to follow.”

King Charles III (PA)
King Charles III (PA)

Finish to proceedings

10:43 , Will Mata

The King finishes his speech and the national anthem plays for the first time in Westminster Hall with its new words.

Charles and the Queen Consort are now walking out of the hall.

 (AFP via Getty Images)
(AFP via Getty Images)

Charles III now departing

10:46 , Will Mata

The King and Queen Consort are now driving away from Westminster.

The pair are now to travel to Scotland for further ceremonies.

Floral tributes at Sandringham

10:52 , Will Mata

Thousands of floral tributes to the Queen who "dedicated her whole life" to the country have been left at her Sandringham estate as the steady stream of people coming to pay their respects continues into a fifth day.

Notices outside the visitor centre at the Norfolk estate say that Sandringham has entered an official period of royal mourning following the Queen's death on Thursday.

 (REUTERS)
(REUTERS)

The signs, on A-boards, are accompanied by a black and white portrait of the Queen.

Tributes started to pile up by the Norwich Gates to Sandringham House within 30 minutes of news of the Queen's death being announced on Thursday evening.

King Charles to lead royal family in procession behind Queen’s coffin

10:58 , Will Mata

King Charles III will lead the royal family in a poignant procession behind the coffin of his mother when it travels to an Edinburgh cathedral to allow the public to pay their respects.

The Queen will be taken from the Palace of Holyroodhouse to nearby St Giles’ Cathedral where her family, and a congregation drawn from all areas of Scottish society, will attend a service of thanksgiving for her life.

See the full article here.

Stop leaving Paddington bear and marmalade tributes for the Queen, mourners told

10:59 , Will Mata

Mourners have been told not to leave bears, balloons or lit candles at a tribute site in Green Park.

People have come up with creative ways to pay their respects to Her Majesty with some leaving marmalade sandwiches and Paddington Bear toys in a nod to her Platinum Jubilee sketch.

A Paddington Bear toy (PA)
A Paddington Bear toy (PA)

However, mourners are now being urged not to leave bears, balloons or lit candles at a dedicated site in Green Park, half a mile from Buckingham Palace.

See the full article here.

First guard mount to take place

11:02 , Will Mata

The first full King's Guard Mount of the reign of King Charles III is due to take place on Monday morning.

The newly recreated Number 12 Company Irish Guards will step off from Wellington Barracks to take over from Number 7 Company The Coldstream Guards, who became the King’s Guard immediately upon the death of the Queen.

The handover will take place on Buckingham Palace forecourt in front of the crowds gathered there.

The first full King’s Guard Mount of the reign of King Charles III is due to take place on Monday morning.

Pictured: King and Queen Consort on way to Scotland

11:06 , Will Mata

 (AFP via Getty Images)
(AFP via Getty Images)

Nicola Sturgeon pays tribute

11:16 , Will Mata

Nicola Sturgeon has paid tribute to the Queen as the "anchor of our nation" ahead of a Motion of Condolence in the Scottish Parliament.

The Scottish First Minister said that in an "ever-changing world, especially in turbulent times" the Queen had been a "great constant".

She also spoke about the Queen's "genuine love of Scotland" and her "profound sense of public service", which Ms Sturgeon said "never faltered".

Her comments came ahead of tributes to Elizabeth II at a special sitting of the Scottish Parliament later on Monday.

All business there was suspended last week after it was announced on Thursday that she had died peacefully at Balmoral Castle.

King arrives at RAF Northolt

11:20 , Will Mata

King Charles III and his convoy have arrived at RAF Northolt - from where he will fly to Edinburgh.

He is about to board the small aircraft.

Queen spent precious moments with great grandchildren

11:22 , Will Mata

The Queen shared precious moments with the Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s children just a few months before her death, their father revealed in a touching tribute to the late monarch.

Harry described how his grandmother hugged his children - Archie, three, and Lilibet, 15 months - likely when the family visited the UK in June to attend the Queen’s platinum jubilee celebrations.

Harry, Meghan and Archie as a baby (Toby Melville/PA) (PA Wire)
Harry, Meghan and Archie as a baby (Toby Melville/PA) (PA Wire)

At the time, it was not known if the Sussexes had met privately with the Queen during their stay at their Frogmore cottage home close to Windsor Castle.

In his heartfelt tribute to his grandmother, the duke said: “Granny, while this final parting brings us great sadness, I am forever grateful for all of our first meetings - from my earliest childhood memories with you, to meeting you for the first time as my Commander-in-Chief, to the first moment you met my darling wife and hugged your beloved great-grandchildren.

“I cherish these times shared with you, and the many other special moments in between.”

Cathedral in Royal Mile to be centre for tributes in Edinburgh

11:29 , Will Mata

The cathedral at the heart of Edinburgh’s historic Royal Mile will become the centre of tributes to the late Queen later on Monday.

The service at St Giles’ Cathedral, led by Reverend Calum MacLeod, is set to celebrate the life of the Queen and her connection to Scotland, and will be attended by the King and the Queen Consort.

The Queen’s coffin will be taken from the Palace of Holyroodhouse to the High Street cathedral where her family, and a congregation drawn from all areas of Scottish society, will attend the service of thanksgiving.

The King will lead some of the royals - expected to be the Duke of York, Earl of Wessex and the Princess Royal and her husband Vice Admiral Sir Tim Laurence - on foot while the Queen Consort and other members of the monarchy follow in cars.

Mourners are expected to hear a reading of Ecclesiastes from First Minister Nicola Sturgeon, as well as words from Nigerian student Samuel Nwokoro, the Right Reverend Dr Iain Greenshields, the Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, and others.

Woman charged after ‘breach of peace’ outside St Giles' Cathedral

11:31 , Will Mata

A woman who was arrested during the Accession Proclamation for the new King in Edinburgh has been charged.

Police Scotland said the 22-year-old is due to appear at Edinburgh Sheriff Court at a later date.

A force spokesperson said: "A 22-year-old woman was arrested outside St Giles' Cathedral, Edinburgh, on Sunday 11 September 2022 in connection with a breach of the peace.

"She was charged and was released on an undertaking to appear at Edinburgh Sheriff Court at a later date."

A procession of the Queen's coffin from the Palace of Holyroodhouse to the cathedral is due to take place later on Monday.

Pedestrian stops traffic to get picture

11:34 , Will Mata

Television pictures showed the man, dressed in a light T-shirt and blue trousers, first tried to take a photo at a pedestrian crossing before running along the pavement to catch up, then taking a photo and holding up his hand to a van to stop.

A pedestrian was seen running on to a three-lane carriageway to take a photo of the King’s state limousine as it slowed to a near stop in traffic in London.

- At 11.33am, the King and Queen Consort had boarded their plane and were bound for take off.

Prince Andrew will not wear uniform - reports

11:39 , Will Mata

 (REUTERS)
(REUTERS)

Working members of the royal family will wear military uniform when present at five ceremonial events during this period of mourning the Queen.

These are the Service of Thanksgiving at St Giles' Cathedral, Edinburgh, the procession to Westminster Hall and service of prayer and reflection, the Vigil at Westminster Hall, the state funeral at Westminster Abbey and the Committal Service at St George's Chapel Windsor.

But as a non-working member of the royal family, the Duke of York will not wear uniform except as a special mark of respect for the Queen at the final vigil in Westminster Hall, sources said.

Floral tributes at Green Park

11:40 , Will Mata

Well-wishers have dropped flowers into the fountain in Green Park near Buckingham Palace to pay their respects to the Queen.

Flowers and teddy bears, including a stuffed corgi, continue to be laid at the foot of the fountain.

Sylvia Willcox, who laid flowers, remembers watching the Coronation on television when she was seven.

 (AFP via Getty Images)
(AFP via Getty Images)

She told the PA news agency she wanted to come to the palace "to pay respects and to see everyone in the same frame of mind.

She said of the Queen, "we've always admired her and loved her".

Pub reveals mural to honour late monarch

11:47 , Will Mata

A city pub has paid tribute to the Queen by painting a mural of the late monarch on its shutters.

Bouquets of flowers have also been placed outside The Bristol Bar in Glasgow as a mark of respect.

The words “Queen Elizabeth II 1926 to 2022” have been written at the bottom of the shutter while a picture of the Queen and the dates of her life have also been mounted above the door.

In a social media post alongside photos of the mural, bar staff wrote: “Thank you for everything Ma’am x Love the Bristol Bar”.

The post has been liked more than 4,300 times on Facebook, with hundreds of people leaving messages praising the new artwork.

London Symphony Orchestra to continue

11:56 , Will Mata

The London Symphony Orchestra has announced its concerts in London this week will take place but will now begin with the National Anthem.

A tweet from its official account said: "We confirm that this week's LSO concerts at the Barbican on Wed 14, Thu 15 & Sun 18 will go ahead as planned, with no changes to the repertoire but with the addition of the National Anthem at the start of each concert. We look forward to welcoming everyone."

Pictured: King Charles III and Queen Consort leave Westminster Hall

12:04 , Sami Quadri

 (PA)
(PA)

Nationwide minute’s silence for the Queen to take place on Sunday

12:10 , Sami Quadri

People will be invited to come together to “mourn and reflect on the life and legacy of Queen Elizabeth II” during a minute’s silence on Sunday, No 10 said.

The Prime Minister’s official spokesman said: “At 8pm on Sunday 18 September, the night before the state funeral, there will be a one-minute silence where the public are invited to come together and observe a national moment of reflection to mourn and reflect on the life and legacy of Queen Elizabeth II.

“The silence can be marked privately at home on your own or with friends and neighbours, out on your doorstep or street with neighbours, or at any locally arranged community events and vigils.

“We encourage local community groups, clubs and other organisations to mark this moment of reflection. And if you are overseas, people are encouraged to mark the silence at their local time.

“The shared national moment of reflection is an opportunity for everyone across the UK to mark the death of Her Majesty and we will set out details of where the Prime Minister will mark it closer to that time.”

Commuters warned London will be “extremely busy” for Queen’s lying-in-state

12:22 , Sami Quadri

Commuters may want to “change their working patterns accordingly” as London will be “extremely busy” for the Queen’s lying in state, No 10 said.

The Prime Minister’s official spokesman said: “At this point we can’t be more specific on numbers. We do expect it to be extremely busy.

“I think for the Queen Mother it was around 200,000 people (who attended), we expect (it) to be far more than that for this lying in state. But at this point, but we can’t be more specific into exact numbers.”

On whether commuters should work from home this week if they normally travel into the capital from outside London, he said some people “may wish to change their working patterns accordingly”, but acknowledged “not everyone will have that ability”.

Asked if there will be any facilities for people who physically cannot queue for 30 hours, he said: “Obviously we want everyone to be able to attend regardless of whether they have disabilities. Our focus is on ensuring they have the information needed to make the decision about what’s right for them.

“There will be toilet facilities, there will be first aid available, there will be the ability for people obviously to go and use toilets and return to queues and things like that.”

12:30 , Sami Quadri

Peers have continued the process of taking the oath of allegiance to King Charles III.

A large number gathered in the House of Lords an hour after the ceremony in Westminster Hall attended by the King.

The Lord Speaker, Lord McFall of Alcluith, said: “I should like to inform the House that I have received a great many letters of condolence on the occasion of the death of Her late Majesty the Queen from our friends and colleagues in other parliaments in countries from across the globe.

“With the permission of the House, I will respond appropriately on the House’s behalf and also arrange for the original letters to be published on the parliamentary website after the period of mourning.”

Downing Street refuses to comment on reports world leaders have been told to avoid private jets when travelling to London

12:46 , Sami Quadri

Downing Street has refused to comment on reports that world leaders visiting London for the state funeral of the Queen have been asked to travel on commercial flights and will be bussed to Westminster Abbey.

The Prime Minister’s official spokesman refused to discuss the details, first reported by news website Politico.

“That is a leaked document so I wouldn’t be getting into it and I couldn’t get into some of those details for operational security arrangements.

“I would say that clearly arrangements for leaders including how they travel will vary depending on individual circumstances. And the guidance and information provided is guidance. But beyond that, I wouldn’t comment,” he said.

The spokesman said that the Government is taking the lead on travel arrangements, while the guestlist is a matter for Buckingham Palace.

Queen hailed as ‘courageous and gracious’ leader in special sitting of Stormont

12:47 , Sami Quadri

The Queen was a “courageous and gracious leader” who contributed to peace and reconciliation in Northern Ireland, a special sitting of the Stormont Assembly has been told.

MLAs gathered at Stormont on Monday, where Speaker Alex Maskey opened the session, which heard tributes to the late monarch from both unionist and nationalist parties.

Speaking first, Sinn Fein vice president Michelle O’Neill said the Queen’s life and legacy will be “fondly remembered by many people around the world”.

“Today I wish to record the value and respect I place on the significant contribution Queen Elizabeth made to the advancement of peace and reconciliation between the different traditions on our island, and between Ireland and Britain during the years of the peace process,” she said.

“I recognise that she was a courageous and gracious leader.”

King Charles III arrives in Edinburgh

12:52 , Sami Quadri

The King and Queen Consort stepped off the plane at a blustery but bright Edinburgh airport on Monday.

Their plane landed just before 12.30pm, having taken off from RAF Northolt in Hillingdon, west London.

They were met by Scotland’s First Minister Nicola Sturgeon and the Lord Provost of the City of Edinburgh Robert Aldridge.

While Camilla got into the waiting car, Charles briefly spoke with Secretary of State for Scotland Alister Jack, Police Scotland chief constable Sir Iain Livingstone and Edinburgh Airport chairman Sir John Elvidge.

The royal couple were then driven from the airport, escorted by police.

The King is due to inspect a guard of honour at the Palace of Holyroodhouse before attending a Ceremony of the Keys on the forecourt.

King welcomed in Scotland

13:14 , Will Mata

King Charles III has been greeted with traditional bagpipes as he arrives at Holyroodhouse in Edinburgh.

 (AFP via Getty Images)
(AFP via Getty Images)

One minute’s silence for Queen

13:16 , Will Mata

The nation will hold a minute’s silence at 8pm on Sunday to mourn the Queen’s death and reflect on her life and legacy.

People are invited to mark the occasion privately at home, on their doorstep or street, or at community events and vigils, No 10 said.

Those living overseas are also encouraged to take part at 8pm their time.

Downing Street said the “shared national moment of reflection” will be an opportunity for everyone across the UK to mark the Queen’s death.

The Prime Minister’s official spokesman said people are encouraged to “come together”.

First person arrives to see Queen lying in state - 48 hours early

13:17 , Will Mata

Vanessa Nathakumaran, 56, from Harrow, arrived at noon on Monday - more than 48 hours before the queue opens on Wednesday at 5pm.

She told the PA news agency she started admiring the royal family in her childhood in Sri Lanka before she moved to the UK in the 1980s.

Her great-uncle was knighted by King George VI and her daughter met the Queen as a air cadet, she said.

“I’m really proud of our family being involved in the time of the Queen’s life.”

Asked why she had arrived to queue so early, she said: “I really really want to be part of it.”

She added of the Queen: “She has done a good service to our country.”

The first person to begin queuing for the Queen’s lying in state in London said she “really, really wanted to be part of it”.

Reshuffle on hold while mourning period continues

13:20 , Will Mata

The Government will continue with the remaining ministerial reshuffle once the period of mourning for the Queen comes to an end, Downing Street said.

The Prime Minister's official spokesman was asked if Liz Truss's reshuffle remained incomplete, following the death of the Queen.

"I think that the vast majority has been done. There are still a small number of appointments still to be done.

"Obviously they will be done in due course but outside of the mourning period."

 (POOL/AFP via Getty Images)
(POOL/AFP via Getty Images)

London to face unprecedented travel demand

13:22 , Will Mata

London will experience “unprecedented travel demand” in the coming days as people visit the capital to pay their respects to the Queen, transport bosses warned.

Public transport users are being advised that the city will be “exceptionally busy” and they should expect Tube stations to temporarily close to avoid overcrowding.

Planning journeys in advance using the latest information “will be essential”, according to a joint statement by Network Rail, Transport for London and industry body the Rail Delivery Group.

The organisations said: “As Her Majesty’s coffin travels to London to lie in state at the Palace of Westminster, it is expected that we will see unprecedented travel demand in the capital, especially from Wednesday 14 September.

“Transport providers have well-developed plans with extra staff and services coming on-stream to help people get to where they need to be.”

Gun salute fired for King and Queen Consort

13:26 , Will Mata

A gun salute was fired from Edinburgh Castle moments after the King and the Queen Consort arrived in the Scottish capital.

A 21-gun salute by the 105 Regiment Royal Artillery at Hillsborough Castle, Belfast, to mark the Proclamation of Accession of King Charles III (Brian Lawless/PA) (PA Wire)
A 21-gun salute by the 105 Regiment Royal Artillery at Hillsborough Castle, Belfast, to mark the Proclamation of Accession of King Charles III (Brian Lawless/PA) (PA Wire)

First changing of the guard held

13:29 , Will Mata

The first changing of the guard has taken place since King Charles III was named as Britain’s new monarch on Saturday.

Number 7 Company The Coldstream Guards formally handed over duties to Number 12 Company Irish Guards in simultaneous ceremonies that were held on the forecourt of Buckingham Palace and St James’s Palace in central London on Monday.

It is also the first time there has been a changing of the King’s Guard at the royal palaces for 70 years.

A member of F Company Scots Guards swelters in the heat during the Changing of the Guard ceremony on the forecourt of Buckingham Palace (Victoria Jones/PA) (PA Wire)
A member of F Company Scots Guards swelters in the heat during the Changing of the Guard ceremony on the forecourt of Buckingham Palace (Victoria Jones/PA) (PA Wire)

To mark the historic occasion, just one piece of music was performed as opposed to the usual running mix of regimental marches and pop music.

The Band of the Scots Guards played The King’s Guard March, which was composed in 1904, as it led the new guard from Wellington Barracks until they arrived at the gates of Buckingham Palace.

The Ministry of Defence said it was “only fitting” the Coldstream Guards were involved with Monday’s event as they are the same regiment who ensured the Restoration of the monarchy in England in 1660, placing King Charles II on the throne.

The exchange of duties took place as crowds of mourners continued to arrive at Buckingham Palace to pay their respects to the Queen.

William and Harry will not take part in procession

13:53 , Will Mata

The new Prince of Wales and his brother the Duke of Sussex will not take part in the procession that will follow the Queen's coffin as it is moved from the Palace of Holyroodhouse to Edinburgh's St Giles' Cathedral later on Monday.

The Queen's children will take the lead, with Charles joined by the Princess Royal, Earl of Wessex and Duke of York.

Crowds on the Royal Mile (AFP via Getty Images)
Crowds on the Royal Mile (AFP via Getty Images)

The royal siblings will walk in a line behind the hearse carrying their mother's coffin and a few steps behind will by Anne's husband Vice Admiral Sir Tim Laurence.

Following in a car will be the Queen Consort and the Countess of Wessex.

Crowds could be ‘target for terrorism'

14:01 , Will Mata

She told BBC Radio 4’s World At One programme: “London could potentially be full. We are expecting to have people queuing for 12, 15 hours at a time just to file past the coffin, which is a real concern because crowds attract criminals”.

She said it could be busier than it was for the 2012 Olympic Games or for the funerals of the Queen Mother and Diana, Princess of Wales.

“I don’t ever remember London expecting to be full in this way, even with the Olympics,” she said.

“The crowds themselves will be a target for terrorists. The funeral itself will be a target for terrorists”.

She added: “All the services are going to be stretched and with the queues that are going be right across central London, you could have streets that are going to be quite difficult to walk down.”

Crowds gathering in London for the Queen’s funeral could be a “target for terrorists”, former Met Police chief superintendent Parm Sandhu has warned.

Pictured: King Charles and Queen Consort Camilla inside Westminster Hall

14:07 , Will Mata

King Charles and Queen Consort Camilla sit inside Westminster Hall (AP)
King Charles and Queen Consort Camilla sit inside Westminster Hall (AP)

Duke of Sussex remembers ‘commander in chief’ granny making him smile at passing out parade

14:09 , Will Mata

The Duke of Sussex has recalled the sweet memory of how his “Commander-in-Chief” Granny made him smile and blush during his Sandhurst passing out parade.

The Queen, who was head of the Armed Forces, inspected the rows of new cadets when Harry was commissioned as an officer in the British Army in 2006.

In his written tribute to the late monarch on Monday, Harry described their “first meeting” in his earliest military role.

“Granny, while this final parting brings us great sadness, I am forever grateful for all of our first meetings - from my earliest childhood memories with you, to meeting you for the first time as my Commander-in-Chief, to the first moment you met my darling wife and hugged your beloved great-grandchildren,” he said.

He spoke of her “infectious smile” and said “I cherish these times shared with you, and the many other special moments in between”.

He was thought to be referring to the time 16 years ago, when as a newly commissioned 21-year-old officer, he gave his grandmother a huge grin as she stopped to talk to him at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst in Camberley, Surrey.

She was thought to have delivered a witty quip to him as she reviewed the cadets on the parade ground and spotted him in one of the rows.

Royal Mile busy with well-wishers

14:12 , Will Mata

Northern Ireland leaders pay respects to Queen in special sitting of parliament

14:16 , Will Mata

Duchess of Sussex halts Archetypes release

14:32 , Will Mata

The Duchess of Sussex speaking at the One Young World 2022 Manchester Summit at Bridgewater Hall, Manchester (Peter Byrne/PA) (PA Wire)
The Duchess of Sussex speaking at the One Young World 2022 Manchester Summit at Bridgewater Hall, Manchester (Peter Byrne/PA) (PA Wire)

The Duchess of Sussex has paused the release of her Spotify podcast, Archetypes, for the duration of the mourning period for the Queen.

Three full episodes of the audio series have been released since its launch on August 23, featuring conversations with veteran tennis player Serena Williams, pop star Mariah Carey and actress and producer Mindy Kaling.

Meghan andHarry signed a lucrative deal with the audio streaming giant to host and produce podcasts, estimated to be worth around 25 million US dollars (£18 million), in late 2020.

A message on the podcast's Spotify page said: "New episodes of Archetypes will be paused during the official mourning period for Her Majesty The Queen Elizabeth II."

A period of "royal mourning" will continue until seven days after the Queen's funeral on Monday September 19.

Buckingham Palace said royal mourning will be observed by members of the royal family, Royal Household staff and representatives of the Royal Household on official duties, together with troops committed to ceremonial duties.

National mourning, meanwhile, continues until the end of the day of the Queen's funeral.

100th birthday cards paused

14:34 , Will Mata

Congratulatory messages on behalf of the monarch to people who reach their 100th birthday or couples marking milestone anniversaries have been temporarily paused.

Over the past decades, thousands of birthday and wedding anniversary cards have been sent every year on behalf of the Queen to members of the public, arranged by the Anniversaries Office at Buckingham Palace.

They are sent to those celebrating their 100th and 105th birthday and every birthday thereafter, and those celebrating their 60th, 65th and 70th wedding anniversaries and every anniversary thereafter.

Following the Queen's death, future messages will be sent on behalf of her son, King Charles III.

It is not clear when the congratulatory cards will resume.

Video: The Queen's coffin carried to St Giles Cathedral

14:41 , Will Mata

Procession begins taking Queen’s coffin to St Giles’ Cathedral

14:45 , Will Mata

The procession of the Queen's coffin from the Palace of Holyroodhouse to St Giles' Cathedral has begun.

The coffin is draped with the Royal Standard in Scotland and dressed with a wreath of flowers consisting of white Spray Roses, white Freesias, white button chrysanthemums, dried white heather from Balmoral, spray eryngium, foliage, rosemary, hebe, and pittosporum.

 (Getty Images)
(Getty Images)

The Queen will be taken from the Palace of Holyroodhouse to the cathedral where her family, and a congregation drawn from all areas of Scottish society, will attend a service of thanksgiving for her life.

A wreath on her coffin will consist of nine different flowers, including white spray roses, white freesias, white button chrysanthemums and dried white heather.

The wreath will also contain thistles, foliage, rosemary, hebe and pittosporum.

The coffin is due to rest at the cathedral for 24 hours.

Before it arrives at the cathedral, it will be greeted by the Guard of Honour and Band in front of the fountain, with the High Constables and the Baillie's Guard in position under the Colonnade.

When the coffin arrives, the guard of honour will give a royal salute and the band will play one verse of the national anthem.

The bearer party, found by the Royal Regiment of Scotland, will then take up their flanking position.

The escort party, found by the King's Body Guard for Scotland, and royal cars, flanked by members of the royal family, walking in rear of the procession, will take their positions close to the hearse.

The guard of honour is set to be accompanied by a pipe band with drums, draped and muffled.

Pictured: King Charles inspects honour guard at Holyrood

14:53 , Will Mata

King Charles III inspects honour guard (POOL/AFP via Getty Images)
King Charles III inspects honour guard (POOL/AFP via Getty Images)

Soaring hotel bills for people visiting London for funeral

15:01 , Will Mata

People planning to visit London for the Queen’s funeral face soaring hotel bills.

Hotel prices are up to four times higher on Sunday - the night before the funeral - compared with a week later, analysis by the PA news agency found.

Hundreds of thousands of people are expected to line the streets of the capital during the funeral at Westminster Abbey.

Many visitors travelling long distances will need to spend the night before in a hotel as the service begins at 11am.

But the cheapest room at Park Plaza County Hall - one of the closest hotels to Westminster Abbey - on Sunday night costs £1,299 compared with £269 seven days later.

Crowne Plaza London Albert Embankment is charging £708 on the eve of the funeral.

That is nearly three times more than on Sunday September 25, when the price is £244.

Rooms at Novotel London Waterloo cost £490 on Sunday and £241 a week later.

Many hotels near Westminster Abbey owned by lower-priced chains such as Premier Inn and Travelodge are fully booked for Sunday night.

Procession nearing its conclusion

15:11 , William Mata

 (POOL/AFP via Getty Images)
(POOL/AFP via Getty Images)

Pictured: Long queues outside Buckingham Palace

15:14 , Will Mata

Long queues along the Mall (AP)
Long queues along the Mall (AP)

Pictured: King Charles leads procession

15:16 , Will Mata

Britain's King Charles, Princess Anne, Prince Andrew and Prince Edward follow the hearse carrying the coffin of Britain's Queen Elizabeth, in Edinburgh (REUTERS)
Britain's King Charles, Princess Anne, Prince Andrew and Prince Edward follow the hearse carrying the coffin of Britain's Queen Elizabeth, in Edinburgh (REUTERS)

Coffin arrives at St Giles’ Cathedral

15:18 , Will Mata

The Queen’s coffin has arrived at St Giles’ Cathedral in Edinburgh ahead of a service of prayer and reflection attended by the King and the Queen Consort, Princess Royal, Duke of York and the Earl and Countess of Wessex.

The coffin was lifted out of the hearse and brought into the place of worship, with the King, the Queen Consort, the Princess Royal, her husband Vice Admiral Sir Tim Laurence, the Duke of York, and the Earl and the Countess of Wessex walking behind.

As the coffin made its way through the cathedral the choir sang Thou Wilt Keep Him In Perfect Peace, Whose Mind Is Stayed On Thee.

Pictured: Royals march behind funeral procession

15:28 , Will Mata

The procession continues through central Edinburgh (AP)
The procession continues through central Edinburgh (AP)

Service underway at St Giles’ Cathedral

15:33 , Miriam Burrell

A sombre service led by Rev Calum MacLeod is underway at St Giles’ Cathedral in Edinburgh, where the Queen’s coffin lies.

The Queen’s coffin was placed on a wooden catafalque as the congregation continued to stand.

The Crown of Scots, first used at Mary Queen of Scots coronation in 1543, was placed on the coffin by the Duke of Hamilton.

King Charles III, Queen Consort, and other members of the royal family, walked to their seats alongside the coffin.

The King has his wife to his left and the Duke of York to his right.

Pictured: Queen’s coffin arrives at St Giles’ Cathedral

15:38 , Miriam Burrell

 (Getty Images)
(Getty Images)
 (AFP via Getty Images)
(AFP via Getty Images)
 (AP)
(AP)

Bible passage read by Scottish First Minister

15:41 , Miriam Burrell

First Minister of Scotland Nicola Sturgeon read a bible passage from the book of Ecclesiastes before Psalm 118 was sung by Karen Matheson, accompanied by Catriona McKay on harp.

A service for the Queen is underway at St Giles’ Cathedral in Edinburgh before members of the public can view the Queen’s coffin lying in state.

The Psalms will have often been sung by the Queen and her family at Crathie Kirk in Balmoral.

The music at the service incorporates material that is European, Anglican and Scottish and is drawn from composers of sacred music – Bach, Byrd, Purcell and Tallis.

 (PA)
(PA)

Heckler on Royal Mile arrested

15:51 , Miriam Burrell

Police Scotland said a 22-year-old man had been arrested “in connection with a breach of the peace on the Royal Mile”.

Footage appeared to show a man heckling the royal procession as it went past.

Queen asked for wisdom ‘like King Solomon'

16:01 , Miriam Burrell

The Rt Rev Dr Iain Greenshields, Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, delivered the homily in St Giles’ Cathedral.

“Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth began her reign, like King Solomon by asking for wisdom, something that she demonstrated in large measure and to which was added duty, honour, commitment, and faith.

“These are the words that we reach out for today to describe the life and the reign of Queen Elizabeth.”

 (AP)
(AP)

Queen ‘valued as neighbour and friend’ at Balmoral

16:06 , Miriam Burrell

Thr Rt Rev Dr Iain Greenshields said the Queen’s “love of the Balmoral Estate is well known and being there laterally brought her great comfort”.

“There she was valued as a neighbour and a friend and there she grew rest and refreshment in the summer months,” he said during a service at St Giles’ Cathedral in Edinburgh.

The Queen received the Scottish Crown in 1953, he said. It was placed on the Queen’s coffin.

 (AP)
(AP)

National anthem ends St Giles’ Cathedral service

16:15 , Miriam Burrell

Guests at the service at St Giles’ Cathedral sung the national anthem - God Save the King.

The service ended shortly after this and the King and Queen Consort left the church, with his siblings following behind.

They will return to the church to take part in a vigil for their mother, the Queen, this evening.

Public clap as King Charles leaves St Giles’ Cathedral

16:19 , Miriam Burrell

People who have lined the Royal Mile clapped and cheered as the King was driven past, leaving behind his mother’s coffin at St Giles’ Cathedral.

It’s now time for members of the public in Edinburgh to see the Queen’s coffin lying in state and pay their respects, over a 24-hour period.

Pictured: Man arrested in Edinburgh

16:35 , Miriam Burrell

A man was arrested before the cortege carrying the Queen’s coffin passed on the Royal Mile in Edinburgh.

 (Getty Images)
(Getty Images)

‘Most’ court hearings on day of Queen’s funeral to adjourn

16:42 , Miriam Burrell

Most court hearings scheduled for the same day as the Queen’s state funeral, September 19, will be adjourned, the Government has announced.

“We’ll adjourn cases where defendants have been remanded in custody to appear in court on the day of the funeral to the next available date,” a statement from the Courts and Tribunal Service and Ministry of Justice said.

“Urgent hearings, including overnight custody cases will continue in consultation with the judiciary. Where possible, and in consultation with the relevant judiciary, we’ll seek to list these types of hearings either side of the funeral.”

Pictured: Service at St Giles’ Cathedral

16:51 , Miriam Burrell

 (AP)
(AP)
 (PA)
(PA)
 (PA)
(PA)

Police officers bolstered at London stations

16:59 , Miriam Burrell

British Transport Police is boosting the number of officers at main railway stations in the run-up to the Queen’s funeral, the force has said.

Assistant Chief Constable Sean O’Callaghan said the public can expect to see “a marked increase” in the number of uniformed officers on patrol on the transport network in London.

He said: “We know it’s very important that people are able to travel in the coming days, as many seek to pay their respects and celebrate Her Majesty and her dedication to public service.

“We expect the rail network to become increasingly busy, especially at main transport hubs in London. People can expect to see a marked increase in highly visible patrols, with more officers on hand to support those travelling and to deter any criminality.”

 (AP)
(AP)

Queen ‘absolutely on it’ in finals days, Boris Johnson says

17:19 , Miriam Burrell

Boris Johnson has told how the Queen had been “absolutely on it” in their final meeting just two days before her death.

The MP met the Queen in Balmoral to formally resign as prime minister to make way for Liz Truss on September 6.

Mr Johnson told the BBC: “In that audience she had been absolutely on it.

“It was quite extraordinary. She seemed very bright, very focused. Look, she was clearly not well…”

London: Third person joins line to see Queen’s lying in state

17:23 , Miriam Burrell

Grace Gothard, from Mitcham in Surrey, is the third person to join the queue by Lambeth Bridge for the Queen’s lying in state.

Ms Gothard had a Union flag draped around her neck and was carrying a cardboard cutout of the Queen and some marmalade.

She had no tent, sleeping bag or coat.

She told reporters: “The Queen was everyone’s mother, she protected the Commonwealth and made sure everyone is protected.

“I’ve been to royal events in the past, weddings and funerals, and I was so upset when I found out about this, so I wanted to see her coffin.

“I think Charles will be a good king, he has his mother’s traits.”

Watch: Protester heckles Prince Andrew

17:33 , Miriam Burrell

A protester has been arrested after he was seen heckling Prince Andrew as he followed the Queen’s coffin up the Royal Mile in Edinburgh.

Video shows the moment the heckler cups his mouth to shout “Andrew, you’re a sick old man” at the Duke of York before being quickly dragged backwards.

Some members of the crowd shove him to the floor whilst others tried to drown out his remarks shouting “God Save The King!”

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