UK's hidden underwater history exposed by heatwave drought

·4-min read
Ladybower reservoir in the Peak District does so low remains of the Ashopton can be seen. August 14 2022.
The ruins of the village of Ashopton visible in Ladybower Reservoir in Derbyshire after the recent heatwave. (SWNS)

Some of the UK's hidden underwater ruins have been exposed by the heatwave and drought.

The recent hot weather has dried up reservoirs across the country, revealing the previously hidden underwater features.

These include bridges, gardens, churches and villages that are suddenly visible.

An official drought was declared in several parts of England last week as soaring temperatures brought on by the heatwave affected water supplies.

Watch: Drought declared in parts of England

The hot weather finally gave way to heavy showers this week and the Met Office has a yellow warning in place across much of England on Tuesday and Wednesday.

But the heat has already taken its toll on the UK's reservoirs, with water levels dropping dramatically at several locations.

This has meant the re-emergence of some of the country's hidden landmarks.

In pictures: Dry Britain as heatwave leaves reservoirs and rivers empty

Ladybower reservoir in the Peak District does so low remains of the Ashopton can be seen. August 14 2022.
The low water levels at the Ladybower Reservoir in Derbyshire. (SWNS)
Ladybower reservoir in the Peak District does so low remains of the Ashopton can be seen. August 14 2022.
The previously submerged village of Ashopton at Ladybower Reservoir. (SWNS)

At the Ladybower Reservoir in Derbyshire, ruins believed to belong to a church have emerged because of the recent low water levels.

In the 1940s, the villages of Derwent and Ashopton were demolished to make way for the filling of the reservoir.

The ruins, believed to be Derwent's church, were also exposed by low water levels four years ago.

HARROGATE, ENGLAND - JULY 19: People walk along the reservoir bed after water levels in the Thruscross reservoir are partially depleted in the heatwave on July 19, 2022 in Harrogate, England. Yorkshire Water, the regional utility, warned residents to use water wisely during the heatwave, adding that the area has had below average rainfall since last autumn. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
People walk along the reservoir bed after water levels in the Thruscross Reservoir in North Yorkshire. (Getty Images)
HARROGATE, ENGLAND - JULY 19: People sit on the remnants of the 17th century village of West End which can be seen after water levels in the Thruscross reservoir are partially depleted in the heatwave on July 19, 2022 in Harrogate, England. Yorkshire Water, the regional utility, warned residents to use water wisely during the heatwave, adding that the area has had below average rainfall since last autumn. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
A man sits on the remnants of the village of West End which can be seen after water levels in the Thruscross Reservoir depleted. (Getty Images)
HARROGATE, ENGLAND - JULY 19: People sit on the remnants of the 17th century village of West End which can be seen after water levels in the Thruscross reservoir are partially depleted in the heatwave on July 19, 2022 in Harrogate, England. Yorkshire Water, the regional utility, warned residents to use water wisely during the heatwave, adding that the area has had below average rainfall since last autumn. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
The village of West End in the Thruscross Reservoir has been revealed by the heatwave. (Getty Images)

The underwater village of Llanwddyn in Powys, Wales, has been seen for the first time since 1976 after water levels dropped at Lake Vyrnwy.

The village was submerged when the reservoir was created in the 1880s.

But at the moment its stone walls can be viewed after the hot weather dried up much of the reservoir.

Another village which was totally submerged has also made a reappearance.

Parts of the village of West End are visible at the Thruscross Reservoir in North Yorkshire.

The village was covered in water for the construction of the reservoir in the 1960s.

Read more: Underwater village re-emerges for first time in 40 years amid heatwave

MERTHYR TYDFIL, WALES - AUGUST 11: A man walks over an exposed bridge that is normally submerged at Llwyn Onn Reservoir amid the ongoing heat wave on August 11, 2022 near Merthyr Tydfil, Wales. The UK's Met Office has issued an amber heat warning for the next four days with temperatures expected to hit 37C in some parts of the country. (Photo by Carl Court/Getty Images)
A man walks over an exposed bridge that is normally submerged at Llwyn Onn Reservoir near Merthyr Tydfil, Wales. (Getty Images)
MERTHYR TYDFIL, WALES - AUGUST 11: People walk over an exposed bridge that is normally submerged at Llwyn Onn Reservoir amid the ongoing heat wave on August 11, 2022 near Merthyr Tydfil, Wales. The UK's Met Office has issued an amber heat warning for the next four days with temperatures expected to hit 37C in some parts of the country. (Photo by Carl Court/Getty Images)
People walk over an exposed bridge that is normally submerged at Llwyn Onn Reservoir near Merthyr Tydfil, Wales. (Getty Images)

Although parts of the old village are exposed, Yorkshire Water asked people not to walk on areas which are usually underwater.

At Colliford Lake reservoir in Cornwall, trees which were submerged have reappeared because of the hot dry weather.

People walk on the dry cracked earth at Baitings Reservoir in Ripponden, West Yorkshire, where water levels are significantly low. The total stock of water in England's reservoirs at the end of July was 65 percent of its normal capacity - the lowest level for that point in the calendar year since 1995, the Environment Agency has said. Picture date: Friday August 12, 2022. (Photo by Danny Lawson/PA Images via Getty Images)
People walk on the dry cracked earth at Baitings Reservoir in Ripponden, West Yorkshire. (PA Images via Getty Images)
People walk on the dry cracked earth at Baitings Reservoir in Ripponden, West Yorkshire, where water levels are significantly low. The total stock of water in England's reservoirs at the end of July was 65 percent of its normal capacity - the lowest level for that point in the calendar year since 1995, the Environment Agency has said. Picture date: Friday August 12, 2022. (Photo by Danny Lawson/PA Images via Getty Images)
A newly exposed bridge at Baitings Reservoir in Ripponden, West Yorkshire. (PA Images via Getty Images)
An open top car drives past dry cracked earth at Baitings Reservoir in Ripponden, West Yorkshire, where water levels are significantly low. The total stock of water in England's reservoirs at the end of July was 65 percent of its normal capacity - the lowest level for that point in the calendar year since 1995, the Environment Agency has said. Picture date: Friday August 12, 2022. (Photo by Danny Lawson/PA Images via Getty Images)
An open top car drives past dry cracked earth at Baitings Reservoir in Ripponden, West Yorkshire. (PA Images via Getty Images)
BODMIN, ENGLAND - AUGUST 12: Old tree skeletons are exposed due to extremely low water levels at Colliford Lake near Bodmin on August 12, 2022 in Cornwall, United Kingdom.  Water levels at Cornwall’s largest reservoir on Bodmin Moor are currently only 40% full - a low water level not seen since 1995 - revealing a forgotten landscape that has not been seen for decades. After a prolonged period of dry weather, some parts of the southern UK are facing drought conditions, prompting hosepipe bans and other water-conservation measures. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
Old tree skeletons are exposed due to extremely low water levels at Colliford Lake near Bodmin in Cornwall. (Getty Images)

At Llwyn Onn Reservoir neat Merthyr Tydfil in Wales, a bridge that is usually underwater now sits exposed about 2m above a small river.

Low water levels at the Baitings Reservoir near Ripponden, West Yorkshire, have revealed an old bridge which had been submerged in 1956 when the reservoir was completed

Watch: How water shortage brought some regions to hosepipe bans