The Inbetweeners star says he's surprised people still watch the show

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Photo credit: Adam Lawrence - Channel 4
Photo credit: Adam Lawrence - Channel 4

The Inbetweeners has pretty much reached cult status following its end 11 years (!) ago, but one of its stars is genuinely "surprised" that people are still watching the series.

Blake Harrison – who played loveable oaf Neil Sutherland – is yet to wrap his head around the sitcom's success, telling the Independent that he finds the comedy's young new fanbase "really surprising".

"You'd be amazed at how young some kids are when they do watch it," he explained, revealing that parents are allowing children as young as nine to tune in and cringe along with them.

Photo credit: Adam Lawrence - Channel 4
Photo credit: Adam Lawrence - Channel 4

Related: The Inbetweeners star Simon Bird discusses whether the show would be made today

"I've seen it. People come up to me, 'He loves the show.' I'm like, 'How old is he?' 'He's nine,'" Blake said. "I'm [thinking], 'What are you doing? You're not being a good parent.'

"I'm surprised it's still being watched now, if I'm honest. We filmed it in 2007 with series one, and the fact that 14 years later, it's still being shown and there are still teenagers now watching it and enjoying it... that to me is really surprising."

While drawing in an audience with an average age of 10 may well be cause for concern, the fact that teenagers are finding and enjoying The Inbetweeners makes total sense to us.

Photo credit: Film4 - Channel 4
Photo credit: Film4 - Channel 4

Related: Channel 4 clarifies why The Inbetweeners' YouTube channel has been taken down

The actor, who's currently starring in theatre production A Place for We, went on to reflect on the differences between The Inbetweeners and the kind of comedy he watches today, name-checking the likes of Atlanta, Fleabag, and black-ish.

"Nowadays we're getting comedies that are sacrificing sometimes – and in a good way – humour for social commentary," Blake added. "I think it's great... If you have to sacrifice a few laughs to do it, I'm all for it, I'll still watch it.

"Our show was not that – we start the scene with a joke, we end the scene with a joke, every single time."

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