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Noel Gallagher says Labour Party is a ‘f***ing disgrace’ and has ‘betrayed ordinary people’

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Noel Gallagher has condemned Labour for “betraying the working classes” and joked he’d be better off starting his own political party.

The former Oasis star, 54, told the Matt Morgan podcast that he believes the current Labour Party is a “f***ing disgrace”.

“I f***ing hate the Labour Party, they’re a f***ing disgrace. What they’ve become now, a disgrace,” he said.

“They’ve betrayed the working classes, they’ve betrayed ordinary people and they’ve allowed this shower to run the country for however long they’ve f***ing run the country.

“The modern Labour Party is middle-class ****s who f***ing hate the working class, they hate them, it’s as simple as that. “I haven’t voted for years.”

He added: “Anyone in their right mind who does take part in that whole circus is a f***ing idiot.

“I should start a new party called the After Show Party, it would be great.”

Noel Gallagher has fallen out of love with politics (Getty Images)
Noel Gallagher has fallen out of love with politics (Getty Images)

Gallagher made similar comments about Labour when the party was being led by Jeremy Corbyn in 2019.

“The two extremes are the Labour Party don’t respect people who are aspirational, and the Conservative Party don’t protect the vulnerable,” he told the Manchester Evening News. “But somewhere in the middle is where New Labour danced, and they kind of had it f***ing right, and then 9/11 happened, and here we are.”

Gallagher was previously a supporter of Tony Blair, and was pictured at a Downing Street party following his election victory in May 1997.

Two months earlier that year, Gallagher had told audience members at the Brit Awards that Blair was “giving a little hope to young people in this country”, amid the Cool Britannia era.

“Because Thatcherism had coloured all our lives, which was still prevalent with John Major, when Tony Blair came along and I heard him speak I thought – and I still think to this day – he was great,” he told GQ in April this year.

“He’s the last person that made any sense to me. The third way, or centrist politics, was a new thing. I was like, ‘That is f***ing really clever.’ I started meeting them at various awards ceremonies. John Prescott was a bit of a cartoon character, but I thought the rest of them were all right.”

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