OPINION - Talking Point: Should babies be allowed in the House of Commons?

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Creasy said of the warning: “We are missing out on people not because of their skills or experiences but because they haven’t made a way of working the system for people who aren’t men of a certain age with independent means.” (PA Wire)
Creasy said of the warning: “We are missing out on people not because of their skills or experiences but because they haven’t made a way of working the system for people who aren’t men of a certain age with independent means.” (PA Wire)

Labour MP Stella Creasy has received a warning after bringing her 13-week-old son Pip into the House of Commons, prompting widespread controversy.

The Speaker of the House of Commons, Sir Lindsay Hoyle, has since ordered a review into the rules on MPs very young children into Parliament.

According to current rules, MPs can take babies or toddlers with them into the House when they vote, but not when participating in debates.

Sir Lindsay said the warning, issued by Parliament’s Chair of Ways and Means Dame Eleanor Laing, correctly reflected the current rules but it was “extremely important” parents were able to fully participate in Parliamentary work.

“Rules have to be seen in context and they change with the times,” he said to MPs in a statement.

Creasy said of the warning: “We are missing out on people not because of their skills or experiences but because they haven’t made a way of working the system for people who aren’t men of a certain age with independent means.”

“It’s a bit of a mystery. I have two children and I have taken them both into the chamber as needs must to make sure my constituents have representation because I don’t have maternity cover… But yesterday I was told I had committed a parliamentary faux pas in bringing my 13-week- old baby… He doesn’t do very much, he is very well behaved, even Jacob Rees-Mogg acknowledges that, maybe some of my colleagues are noisier than him.”

What do you think? Was the warning fair, or was it an outdated move that discriminates against mothers seeking a political career?

Let us know your thoughts in the comments for the chance to be featured on the ES website tomorrow.

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