Developing

Parking suspended under London skyscraper after claims bright reflections 'melt parked cars'

City workers parking under 20 Fenchurch Street - dubbed 'the walkie talkie' - say the skyscraper's distinctive shape is reflecting intensely bright light onto the road below

Parking bays under a £200m London skyscraper have been suspended - after motorists complained sunlight reflecting off the building is melting their cars.

City workers parking under 20 Fenchurch Street - dubbed 'the walkie talkie' - say the skyscraper's distinctive shape is reflecting intensely bright light onto the road below.

Martin Lindsay, the director of a tiling firm, said the bodywork on his Jaguar was left damaged and warped after he parked his vehicle under the 37-storey building last week.

He told City AM: 'They’re going to have to think of something. I’m gutted. How can they let this continue?'


The building has burnt a hole in a bicycle seat in Eastcheap, London (REX/Ray Tang)

It was also claimed that items including a drinks bottle began to melt inside a van which was parked under the 525ft tower last week.

And the reflective glare has also reportedly caused bike seats to melt.

The skyscraper has already been nicknamed the 'walkie scorchie' after passers-by were forced to shield their eyes from the bright rays reflected off its glass panels.

Others have likened standing under the building in high temperatures as 'like trying to fry ants with a magnifying glass' due to the intense light reflected down.


City workers below the 'Walkie Talkie' building in London feel the heat of the glare (REX/Ray Tang)

Joint developers of 20 Fenchurch Street, Land Securities and Canary Wharf, said they were investigating reports of bright glare.

They said in a statement: 'We are aware of concerns regarding the light reflecting from 20 Fenchurch Street and are looking into the matter.

'As a precautionary measure, the City of London has agreed to suspend three parking bays in the area which may be affected while we investigate the situation further.'

The north and south sides of the skyscraper are concave, while the east and west sides are convex.

The building, due to open next year, has wider upper floors which give the impression of it bursting into the London skyline.