Schools 'to be forced to weigh and measure children' as part of Ofsted obesity inspections

Andy Wells
·Freelance Writer
<em>Schools could be forced to weigh pupils in a drive to tackle overweight children (Rex)</em>
Schools could be forced to weigh pupils in a drive to tackle overweight children (Rex)

Schools in Britain could be forced to weigh pupils for Ofsted inspections as part of a Government strategy to tackle childhood obesity.

The programme would see schools weighing and measuring pupils every year so they can keep track of their health, according to The Times.

Any students identified as obese would be given support to lose weight, including free gym classes and home visits.

<em>Schools could be rated by Ofsted on how well they are able to help children maintain a healthy weight (Rex/posed by models)</em>
Schools could be rated by Ofsted on how well they are able to help children maintain a healthy weight (Rex/posed by models)

Regulator Ofsted would then rate schools on how well they are able to help children keep their weight down.

Baroness Jenkin of Kennington, former chairwoman of the Centre for Social Justice’s obesity working group, told the Times: ‘Nobody, and no child, wants to be fat and we should be doing everything to help children lose weight as long as it is done in a way that doesn’t stigmatise them.

‘It is really important for schools to get involved and be part of the success of the strategy. Not least we need to know what we’re up against and the only way to do that is by regular weighing and measuring.’

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Government ministers put forward the proposals after they visited a project in Amsterdam where officials managed to reduce childhood obesity by 12% within three years.

Public health minister Steve Brine added: ;What I saw in Amsterdam was impressive – particularly the way in which they managed to achieve results among groups that have traditionally been hard to reach.’

The plans are expected to be published in June.