Sign language interpreter steals show during Twista concert

Rebecca Speare-Cole
Amber Galloway Gallego on stage with Twista: Andrew Barber

A sign language interpreter stole the show when she appeared at a concert alongside the US rapper Twista.

Twista, who once held the Guinness World Records' "fastest rapper of all time", was performing in Charlotte, North Carolina.

He was joined by American sign language interpreter Amber Galloway Gallego on stage.

Thousands praised on Twitter after a video was posted by Andrew Barber, who founded Chicago-based music and media company Fake Shore Drive.

He wrote: "Twista's sign language interpreter hitting every single word he fires off on stage is 10/10 content.

"She needs a Guinness World Record."

Twista was performing in Charlotte on Saturday night. (Getty Images)

More than 52,000 people liked the post with Twitter users commenting that "my mind is blown" and "she deserves every bit of this attention!"

Guinness World Records even shared his tweet saying: "Wow, Amber Galloway Gallego is one speedy signer!

"We do have a category for the fastest time to spell the American sign language alphabet - and we'd certainly welcome an application."

  • Read more

At one point during Saturday's set, Twista turned towards Ms Galloway Gallego and the audience went wild for her interpretation.

On social media, Twista commended Ms Galloway Gallego saying: "She's the real MVP for keeping up wit me."

The interpreter previously went viral in 2013 for her performance with Kendrick Lamar at Lollapalooza. She has also worked with artists like Lady Gaga, the Black Keys and Cher.

She has used her viral attention to advocate for the deaf and hard-of-hearing community, calling for more inclusion especially within the arts.

Read more

Read more Abandoned duckling adopts fluffy toy cat as its mother

  • UK records 113 daily deaths - lowest figure since lockdown began
    News
    The Telegraph

    UK records 113 daily deaths - lowest figure since lockdown began

    The UK's daily figure for coronavirus deaths has dropped to 113 - the lowest since the day after lockdown. Latest figures show 113 deaths reported on Sunday, bringing the death toll to 38,489. At its peak in mid-April, the pandemic saw almost 1,200 deaths in Britain daily. Sunday's figure is the lowest since 24 March, when 149 deaths were reported. The evening before that, Prime Minister Boris Johnson had introduced the lockdown. However, weekend figures are typically much lower than those during the week. Last Sunday saw 118 deaths recorded in the UK - but during the week the figure jumped back up to 412. The overall death toll at 38,489 remains the highest in Europe. And statistics from the Office for National Statistics are still higher, with more than 47,000 cases recorded on eath certificates from England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. Deputy chief medical officer Dr Jenny Harries said the latest figures were “significantly better in terms of those affected and their families than we were much further back in April, where you can see the peak.”

  • I can’t breathe: Peckham protests over George Floyd killing as riots rage across US
    News
    Evening Standard

    I can’t breathe: Peckham protests over George Floyd killing as riots rage across US

    Protesters gathered in south London on Saturday to speak out against the death of unarmed African-American man George Floyd.Dozens of demonstrators chanted as they marched through Peckham, in the south-east of the capital, wielding placards reading “solidarity” and “Black lives matter”.

  • Beckhams call repairman after home flooded by overfilled bath
    Celebrity
    PA Media: Entertainment

    Beckhams call repairman after home flooded by overfilled bath

    Victoria Beckham shared a video of the visit.

  • Massive protests raise fears of new coronavirus outbreaks
    News
    PA Media: World News

    Massive protests raise fears of new coronavirus outbreaks

    Hundreds of people have taken to the streets across America in recent days following the police killing of a black man in Minneapolis.

  • Why did the PM do so much to save Cummings?
    News
    Sky video

    Why did the PM do so much to save Cummings?

    Sky's political correspondent Joe Pike has been looking at why Mr Johnson is expending so much political capital to save Dominic Cummings.

  • Spanish health minister bans British holidaymakers 'until UK's coronavirus situation improves'
    News
    Yahoo News UK

    Spanish health minister bans British holidaymakers 'until UK's coronavirus situation improves'

    Tourists from Germany and the Nordic countries are likely to be the first allowed back into Spain.

  • How Boris Johnson’s gamble on one lie too many pushed the British public over the edge
    News
    The Independent

    How Boris Johnson’s gamble on one lie too many pushed the British public over the edge

    It’s one thing to live through a terrifying pandemic, but another thing entirely to do so under a blundering government. And during the past week, as Boris Johnson’s government dodged and lied to protect an adviser, while the nation’s coronavirus death rate became the highest, the mask finally came off even for many previous supporters of this failing administration, exposing the moral vacuum behind it.In just one week, the government trashed its public reputation, with Johnson’s approval dropping an eye-watering 20 points. As news emerged that the prime minister’s aide, Dominic Cummings, flouted lockdown measures with a family road trip to Durham, the nation united in outrage. Nearly 100 Conservative MPs revolted over Johnson defending his chief aide, while vicars, police officers and previously sympathetic columnists have voiced criticism. We watched Cummings claim a drive to Barnard Castle was an entirely permissible sight test and government ministers pretzeled themselves trying to make this sound legit. The ensuing mockery of government was allayed only by public rage.

  • Lockdown easing for Covid-19 ‘shielders’ announced by PM
    News
    PA Media: UK News

    Lockdown easing for Covid-19 ‘shielders’ announced by PM

    Boris Johnson praised their resilience as he said those shielding from Covid-19 in England will be able to spend time with other people outdoors.

  • UK coronavirus LIVE: Death toll rises by 113 as Dominic Raab says strict lockdown measures will return if 'uptick' in cases
    News
    Evening Standard

    UK coronavirus LIVE: Death toll rises by 113 as Dominic Raab says strict lockdown measures will return if 'uptick' in cases

    Dominic Raab has said strict measures will return if there is an "uptick" in coronavirus cases as the UK lockdown is further eased.Speaking to Sky's ​Sophy Ridge on Sunday, he said "we will have to take further measures again and target the virus wherever it may appear".

  • Coronavirus UK map: the latest deaths and confirmed cases near you
    Health
    The Guardian

    Coronavirus UK map: the latest deaths and confirmed cases near you

    Coronavirus UK map: the latest deaths and confirmed cases near youLatest figures from public health authorities on the spread of Covid-19 in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. Find out how many confirmed cases have been reported in each local authority

  • Public warned to remain cautious when lockdown is eased further
    News
    PA Media: UK News

    Public warned to remain cautious when lockdown is eased further

    New freedoms include people who have been shielding, who can go outside from Monday while maintaining social distancing.

  • No Brexit trade deal unless UK keeps promises, warns Barnier
    News
    The Independent

    No Brexit trade deal unless UK keeps promises, warns Barnier

    The UK faces a no-deal Brexit unless Boris Johnson keeps the promises he made when securing the withdrawal agreement, the EU’s chief negotiator has warned.Michel Barnier accused the prime minister of trying to back away from the written commitments in the political declaration signed with the European Commission.

  • UK Records 106 More Coronavirus Deaths In 24 Hours
    News
    HuffPost UK

    UK Records 106 More Coronavirus Deaths In 24 Hours

    The latest figures were published on Sunday.

  • 'We poked the bear': Australian farmers take the China trade stoush in their stride
    News
    The Guardian

    'We poked the bear': Australian farmers take the China trade stoush in their stride

    'We poked the bear': Australian farmers take the China trade stoush in their stride. An 80% tariff on barley means switching to other crops or finding alternative markets. But at least there’s been rain

  • Kensington Palace makes legal complaint over claims Duchess of Cambridge feels 'overworked'
    Celebrity
    The Telegraph

    Kensington Palace makes legal complaint over claims Duchess of Cambridge feels 'overworked'

    Kensington Palace has sent a legal complaint to Tatler magazine over claims the Duchess of Cambridge feels “overworked”, it is understood. The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are understood to have asked that the society magazine remove its ‘Catherine the Great’ profile from the website. The Royal couple are reportedly upset about what they say is unfounded criticism of the Duchess’s family, her children and her weight. The Tatler article described the Duchess as “perilously thin” and referred to Princess Diana’s eating disorders. The society magazine claimed to have spoken to various friends of the Duchess of Cambridge for the profile with a source reportedly claiming the princess feels “exhausted and trapped” after taking on more royal duties following Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s decision to step back. Kensington Palace has denied this account. "Meghan and Harry have been so selfish,” one source told Tatler. “William and Catherine really wanted to be hands-on parents and the Sussexes have effectively thrown their three children under a bus. “There goes their morning school runs as the responsibilities on them now are enormous." Another source allegedly added: “Kate is furious about the larger workload. Of course she's smiling and dressing appropriately but she doesn't want this. She feels exhausted and trapped. “She's working as hard as a top CEO, who has to be wheeled out all the time, without the benefits of boundaries and plenty of holidays.” Earlier this week a source familiar with the Duchess's work emphatically denied to the Telegraph that she feels "exhausted and trapped" by her duties, saying the description was inaccurate and offensive. They added: “Like many people across the country, the Duchess is juggling home schooling and work. But she's not also having to juggle being a front line worker. She is of course cognisant of that. "That's who she would much prefer the attention to be on." A Royal source told The Mail on Sunday the description of the Duchess as “perilously thin” is “such an extremely cruel and wounding barb. It's disgusting. It's sexist and woman-shaming at its very worst. “The [Tatler] piece is full of lies. There is no truth to their claim that the Duchess feels overwhelmed with work, nor that the Duke is obsessed with Carole Middleton. It's preposterous and downright wrong.” Tatler's article also claims that the Duchess had an argument with the Duchess of Sussex Meghan Markle ahead of her wedding to Prince Harry in 2018. It claimed the row took place at a rehearsal two days before the wedding and was over whether the young bridesmaids should wear tights. Quoting an unnamed friend, the article said: “There was an incident at the wedding rehearsal. It was a hot day and apparently there was a row over whether the bridesmaids should wear tights or not. “Kate, following protocol, felt that they should. Meghan didn't want them to. The photographs suggest that Meghan won." But Kensington Palace insisted the story is wrong, the Mail on Sunday reported. In response to the Tatler claims a Kensington Palace spokesperson said at the time: “This story contains a swathe of inaccuracies and false misrepresentations which were not put to Kensington Palace prior to publication”. Tatler issued its own statement: “Tatler's Editor-in-Chief Richard Dennen stands behind the reporting of Anna Pasternak and her sources. “Kensington Palace knew we were running the 'Catherine the Great' cover months ago and we asked them to work together on it. The fact they are denying they ever knew is categorically false.” During the pandemic the Cambridges are working from home at Anmer Hall, homeschooling Prince George, Princess Charlotte and Prince Louis while holding royal engagements over Zoom. Along with the rest of the Royal Family, they have changed the focus of their work to helping the country through the coronavirus crisis, paying particular attention to mental health. The children have joined in the "clap for our carers" movement, and delivered homemade pasta to their isolated neighbours. Since the Covid-19 lockdown, the Duchess of Cambridge has launched photography exhibition Hold Still, and taken part in video calls to schools, hospitals and maternity services, as well as playing bingo with pensioners to highlight social care. Tatler did not respond to a request for comment on the legal complaint and Kensington Palace declined to comment.

  • Fire, pestilence and a country at war with itself: the Trump presidency is over
    Politics
    The Guardian

    Fire, pestilence and a country at war with itself: the Trump presidency is over

    Fire, pestilence and a country at war with itself: the Trump presidency is overA pandemic unabated, an economy in meltdown, cities in chaos over police killings. All our supposed leader does is tweet

  • Boris Johnson blocks Corbyn’s recommendation for John Bercow peerage
    News
    The Telegraph

    Boris Johnson blocks Corbyn’s recommendation for John Bercow peerage

    Boris Johnson has blocked Jeremy Corbyn’s recommendation for John Bercow to receive a peerage over allegations of bullying by the former Speaker. Downing Street said it would not approve Labour’s nomination of Mr Bercow for elevation to the upper chamber because there are outstanding concerns about his “propriety”. Karie Murphy, Mr Corbyn’s former chief of staff, was also blocked for appointment to the Lords over an Equalities and Human Rights Commission investigation into alleged institutional anti-Semitism in the Labour Party. The Jewish Labour Movement said her nomination was “deeply inappropriate”. Ms Murphy denies all allegations of anti-Semitism. Officials at Downing Street informed Mr Corbyn his nominations would be rejected before he stepped down as leader, The Sunday Times reported. The House of Lords Appointments Commission had concerns about both Mr Bercow and Ms Murphy’s “propriety”. Mr Bercow, who stood down as Speaker at the end of October, was referred to the parliamentary commissioner of standards in January over allegations of bullying, which he denies. Commons officials accused him of creating a climate of “fear and intimidation” during his time in office, and a former clerk of the Commons said he used “sexually and racially inappropriate” language. Mr Bercow said the claim was “unadulterated rubbish”. His nomination by Labour, which was greeted with surprise when it was leaked in January, cannot proceed to formal approval from the Queen without the backing of the Government. The rejection comes after Boris Johnson broke with tradition by refusing to nominate Mr Bercow for a peerage himself, which is customary of a Government after a Speaker’s retirement. Dawn Butler, a Labour MP who ran for the deputy leadership of her party, said Mr Johnson’s refusal to nominate Mr Bercow was in itself a “form of bullying”. After the commission advised against Labour’s nomination, Downing Street offered Mr Corbyn the option of replacing his nominees last month, allowing him to choose “antiwar” activists instead, the Sunday Times reported. Mr Corbyn is thought to have declined that offer after some consideration. The House of Lords Appointment commission, which does not comment on individual cases, said: “Our guidelines make clear that an individual must be in good standing in general and with the public regulatory authorities in particular.”

  • UK abandoned testing because system 'could only cope with five coronavirus cases a week'
    News
    The Telegraph

    UK abandoned testing because system 'could only cope with five coronavirus cases a week'

    Britain’s disastrous decision to abandon testing for coronavirus occurred because health systems could only cope with five cases a week, official documents show. Newly-released papers from the Scientific Advisory Group on Emergencies shows routine testing and tracing of contacts was stopped because Public Health England’s systems were struggling to deal with a handful of cases. At a meeting on Feb 18, advisors said PHE could only cope with testing and tracing contacts of five Covid-19 cases a week, with modelling suggesting it might only be possible to increase this to 50 cases. Advisors then agreed it was "sensible" to shift to stopping routine testing - despite acknowledging that such a decision would “generate a public reaction”. The decision to give up on testing those with symptoms of coronavirus is now seen as the key reason the UK has the highest death rate in Europe.

  • China says two new coronavirus cases, asymptomatic case on German charter
    News
    Reuters

    China says two new coronavirus cases, asymptomatic case on German charter

    China announced on Sunday two new confirmed cases of coronavirus and four new asymptomatic cases, including one person without symptoms of COVID-19 on a chartered flight from Germany. The two confirmed cases in Shandong province on Saturday compared with four cases the day before, data from the country's health authority showed. The National Health Commission (NHC) confirmed three new asymptomatic cases on Saturday.

  • Smell tests should be introduced in public spaces to spot Covid, says King’s professor
    Health
    The Telegraph

    Smell tests should be introduced in public spaces to spot Covid, says King’s professor

    Smell tests should be introduced in hospitals, airports and shopping centres to monitor the spread of coronavirus, a leading professor has suggested. Tim Spector, Professor of Genetic Epidemiology at King's College London, has suggested that smell tests, which detect whether or not an individual has lost their sense of smell, should be implemented in public places as part of a wider strategy to track coronavirus cases. In May, the UK added ‘anosmia’ - or loss of smell - to the official list of coronavirus symptoms. The announcement followed a study by King’s College London which involved 2.6 million Britons, and revealed that changes in smell and taste were the most reliable indicators of Covid-19. The team discovered that 65 per cent of those who tested positive for coronavirus had reported a loss of smell or taste, compared to 57 per cent of participants who experienced a persistent cough. Prof Spector, lead researcher in the study, argued that smell tests could prove to be a “cheap” and “easy” method to detect coronavirus cases and protect the public. He said: “It would be very cheap and easy to do and is probably more useful than measuring fever because the symptoms persist longer and if you have fever you generally don’t feel like going out anyway.” “At the entrance to a hospital clinic, for example, you could be asked to wash your hands, have your temperature taken, and you could have items to smell. The nurses checking you in could ask - whether or not you could smell certain items - such as peppermint.” With schools set to reopen as soon as next week, Prof Spector argued that the tests could be widely implemented across public spaces such as airports, hospitals and shopping centres. He said: “Wherever there is some sort of control of people going in and out - some sort of security, it makes absolute sense.” “I think people would comply - I believe if you asked most schools, shops and institutions to do this, they would love to, they don’t want to have infected people in their premises.” Smell tests have already begun to be put into place across the world. Earlier this week for example, it was revealed that researchers in Boston have developed an at-home smell test that will be trialled on 400 patients across three hospitals in the local area. Prof Spector, who also serves as the lead investigator for the COVID Symptom Study app, a tool which has monitored the symptoms of more than 3.5 million people in the UK, stressed that given the complexity of the disease, a range of public health tools would be needed. “One method on its own is not going to solve the problem,” he said. “But we have to think, what are the cheap easy ways we can be monitoring coronavirus cases - yes, test temperature if you need to, use smell tests and ask people about minor symptoms they may not have thought about.” “Why not make handwashing mandatory when we go into supermarkets or when we use public transport? I don’t understand why we are not using the cheap public health methods which are more effective than things like track and trace in terms of numbers.”

  • John Bercow will not get peerage despite Corbyn nomination
    News
    The Guardian

    John Bercow will not get peerage despite Corbyn nomination

    John Bercow will not get peerage despite Corbyn nomination. Former speaker remains the subject of an investigation into alleged bullying

  • Iran berates U.S. over police killing, slams racism
    News
    Reuters

    Iran berates U.S. over police killing, slams racism

    Iran took Washington to task on Saturday over the alleged killing of an unarmed black man by a white police officer that sparked protests in the United States over racial injustice. "Some don't think #BlackLivesMatter," Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif said on Twitter. "The U.S. government is squandering its citizens' resources," Zarif said in a tweet echoing a 2018 statement from U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo.

  • Why the UK has no teeth when it comes to China and Hong Kong
    News
    The Telegraph

    Why the UK has no teeth when it comes to China and Hong Kong

    China’s move to impose national security law in Hong Kong has drawn international outcry, including from the UK, over worries that the territory’s treasured liberties are coming to an end. Activists have welcomed greater international attention on the issue. But the UK’s window to pressure Beijing to change course in a meaningful way has largely closed. Hong Kong has experienced shrinking rights and freedoms for years. Elected lawmakers have been disqualified from their positions and outspoken professors have been removed from their posts. Booksellers publishing on sensitive topics have disappeared, later appearing in mainland China on state television “confessing” to various crimes. A British journalist was even expelled from Hong Kong, seemingly for having chaired a talk by a pro-democracy figure. Such instances are among many reasons why mass protests have erupted periodically since the former British colony was returned to Chinese rule in 1997. Each round of unrest has been more chaotic than the last, as people rushed to denounce Beijing’s encroaching influence. China has long made clear it’s position. Officials conveyed for the first time in 2014 that Beijing no longer considered valid the Sino-British Joint Declaration, an international treaty meant to guarantee rights and freedoms for those in Hong Kong. The Chinese government has continued to reiterate outright the document no longer carried any significance. “The time to say something was at latest about six years ago,” said Alvin Cheung, a legal scholar at New York University’s US-Asia Law Institute. “It’s a pretty grim indictment of the international community that all the warning signs have been around for this long and they have been consistently swept under the carpet until the very end.”

  • Three seriously injured jumping from popular tourist spot of Durdle Door in Dorset amid huge crowds
    News
    Newsflare

    Three seriously injured jumping from popular tourist spot of Durdle Door in Dorset amid huge crowds

    Air ambulances treated three people seriously injured after jumping off cliffs into the sea at a beach in Dorset on England's south coast. Video shows helicopters at the scene at the popular tourist spot of Durdle Door on Saturday afternoon (May 30) and long crowds of people making their way from the beach. Images on social media show crowds earlier in the day flocking to the beauty spot in large numbers. In a statement, Dorset Police said: "Officers are appealing to the public to stay away from Durdle Door in Purbeck as emergency services are in attendance to deal with a number of casualties. "Dorset Police was called at 3.43pm on Saturday 30 May 2020 to a report of concern for the safety of people who were jumping off the cliff into the sea. "Officers are at the scene to assist the ambulance service, HM Coastguard and the RNLI with clearing the area. "Three people have sustained serious injuries and are being treated by the ambulance service." Chief Inspector Claire Phillips, of Dorset Police, said: “We have had to close the beach at Durdle Door to allow air ambulances to land. As a result, we are evacuating the beach and the surrounding cliff area."