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The tradition of buying rounds is dying out, with young people preferring to buy their own drinks

The tradition of buying rounds at the pub is in danger of dying out, with young people preferring to buy their own drinks compared to older generations, new research has revealed.

According to research from YouGov, 44% of the public prefer to buy drinks for themselves while 41% like to take it turns and buy rounds.

But the difference is more stark among younger Brits, with 62% of people aged 65 and older saying they prefer to buy rounds, compared to just 26% of 18-24-year-olds.

<em>Young people prefer buying their own drinks rather than rounds, new research has shown (Picture: YouGov)</em>
Young people prefer buying their own drinks rather than rounds, new research has shown (Picture: YouGov)

According to YouGov, each subsequent age group becomes more likely to prefer buying rounds – with crossover occurring at the 45-54 age group.

The reason could be partly financial, it said, with younger people tending to have less disposable income than their elders leading them to prefer to just buy their own drinks.

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The new YouGov Omnibus data also revealed Brits’ keenness for fairness for other people when queuing for a pint – but not so much for themselves.

The research found that if a person found themselves inadvertently jumping the queue, 91% of Britons would tell the bar person that someone else was next.

<em>Brits are also keen for fairness when queuing at a bar, the YouGov research found</em>
Brits are also keen for fairness when queuing at a bar, the YouGov research found

But if the situation was reversed – with a barperson asking to serve someone who had been there for less time than them – only 44% of Brits would speak up, while half (51%) would keep quiet and wait for the staff to get round to them.

Again the divide is down to age – younger Brits are less likely to speak up for themselves than their elders, with 11% of 18-24 year olds saying they would tell the bar staff that they’ve been there longer, compared to 61% among those aged 65 or older.

(Top picture: Getty)