Trump's aides deliberately 'inserting grammatical errors into his tweets to mimic his style'

Maya Oppenheim
The president has become famed for firing off rambling, inflammatory tweets to his 52 million followers in the early hours which include misspellings, typos and other linguistic errors: Getty

Donald Trump’s aides reportedly insert grammatical errors into the US president’s tweets in an attempt to mirror his tweeting style.

The president has become famed for firing off rambling, inflammatory tweets – which include misspellings, typos and other linguistic errors – to his 52 million followers in the early hours.

But two White House staffers have told The Boston Globe that aides are penning tweets which are indistinguishable from those written by the president himself.

The staffers are believed to deliberately adopt symbols of Mr Trump’s tweeting – such as words which are capitalised for emphasis and fragmented sentences.

However, they are not thought to intentionally misspell words or names.

While it was long assumed Mr Trump's ostensibly impromptu tweets must be his own handiwork, it is now generally known the mogul-turned-politico does not write all his own tweets.

According to the publication, when Mr Trump is not tweeting about a topic himself, aides will provide him with several sample tweets they could send from his account and he will select one and occasionally make edits.

The staffers said that if there are photos attached to a tweet or hashtags it was fair to assume it had been tweeted by an aide on behalf of Mr Trump.

The president was mocked on Twitter on Saturday after he misspelt his wife Melania Trump’s name when welcoming her home from hospital.

The First Lady returned to the White House on Saturday from being in hospital for a week after treatment for a kidney condition.

“Great to have our incredible First Lady back home in the White House,” Mr Trump wrote. “Melanie is feeling and doing really well. Thank you for all of your prayers and best wishes!”

The tweet was quickly superseded with another message which spelt the former model’s name correctly.

The world leader’s tweets which include misspelled words are usually deleted and replaced with an amended message.

Other typos penned by Mr Trump on Twitter include "covfefe" – which received worldwide coverage – missing world leader’s names such as "Teresa" May and “Barrack” Obama, and numerous other misspellings such as “rediculous” and “politicons”.

The White House has also issued error-prone news releases. But ironically, during his campaign for president, Mr Trump bragged that he has the “best words.”