UK basks in weather hotter than Madrid or Istanbul

Jon Sharman
Daffodils in full bloom in the sunshine at Castle Park, Bristol: PA

Parts of the UK are basking in weather hotter than Madrid or Istanbul as spring finally makes itself felt.

On the day before the clocks go forward, some areas were due to see temperatures hit a balmy 18C, as residents of the Spanish capital languished under cloudy skies and were looking out for rain on Sunday.

To the east, in Istanbul, things were little better with temperatures a few degrees higher—13C today and 14C on Sunday—but accompanied by the same blanket of cloud, according to the Met Office.

Even areas of the UK that saw snowfall just days ago, like Northumberland, were due to enjoy sun and temperatures in the mid-teens this weekend.

Among the hottest areas of the UK on Saturday were Camborne, in Cornwall, and Exeter, up the coast in Devon, which were forecast to hit 18C. Pembroke in Wales was due to reach 17C.

The Met Office said Sunday "will be dry and fine, with long sunny spells. It could be cloudier for the South West and the Northern Isles though, but for many it'll be pleasantly warm."

"Monday will be largely dry and bright. Showers will then move in from the west on Tuesday, with outbreaks of rain in the north and west on Wednesday," it added.

The outlook becomes more unsettled as the week goes on, however.

The forecasters said: "A rather more changeable and breezy pattern will be established across the UK during Thursday, particularly for the north and west, with some heavy rain probable here.

"The driest and brightest conditions are expected in eastern and southern areas of the UK, where it will feel pleasantly warm.

"By the weekend, we'll continue to see unsettled conditions across the UK, with bands of rain moving west to east, interspersed by brighter and showery interludes.

"It'll be often windy, particularly in the north and northwest, with gales at times. We are likely to see a good deal of settled and dry weather becoming established across the UK towards the end of the period though, especially in the south."

Scientists have warned that increasing temperatures across the world are the result of global warming and are nothing to celebrate.

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