Ukip pledges to ban the burka and outlaw Sharia law as party's election manifesto aims at core supporters

Ben Riley-Smith
Ukip will promise tomorrow to ban the burka from being worn in public as it shelves a rebrand that was planned before the election.   

Ukip will promise on Monday to ban the burka from being worn in public as it shelves a rebrand that was planned before the election. 

The party’s first election manifesto pledges will be based on its an “integration agenda” aimed at its core supporters. 

Sharia law - the religious rules that form part of Islamic tradition - will be outlawed in the UK under the party’s proposals. 

People with evidence of female genital mutilation will be bound by law to inform police, it will be suggested. 

It will also call for postal voting to be abolished for most citizens amid fears it is being used for electoral fraud. 

Peter Whittle, Ukip’s deputy leader, is expected to say that the "established parties are mute either from fear, denial or sheer cowardice" when it comes to the dangers of extremism.

Ukip will promise on Monday to ban the burka from being worn in public as it shelves a rebrand that was planned before the election.    Credit: JOHN D MCHUGH 

Ukip faces the challenge of explaining to voters why it remains relevant after Britain voted to leave the EU last year. 

The party’s support has dropped from close to 13 per cent in the 2015 general election to around 7 per cent, according to recent polls. 

It has also been dogged by a string of public spats between prominent figures and high profile resignations, including its only MP Douglas Carswell. 

A “rebrand” planned to have taken place before the party fought another general election will now not take place before next month’s vote. 

It means Ukip’s distinctive pound sign and purple colour scheme will remain in place as the party puts up candidates across the country. 

Paul Nuttall, the Ukip leader, told the Telegraph that the rebrand was due to be unveiled this autumn but will not be completed before the snap election. 

“We were going to launch the whole post-Brexit Ukip rebrand at autumn party conference after a consultation in the summer,” he said. 

“We’ve now got a general election in the spring. We’re not going to rush anything through. We’ll run at our pace and not Mrs May’s one. 

“In many ways this is a Brexit election and so the pound sign and the Ukip brand are as relevant as ever.

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