Ulrika Jonsson 'signs up' for 'First Dates' after marriage split

Julia Hunt
Contributor
Ulrika Jonsson attends World Premiere of 'One Direction: This Is Us' at Empire Leicester Square in 2013 in London (Mark Cuthbert/UK Press via Getty Images)

Ulrika Jonsson is apparently going on TV to find Mr Right after the end of her third marriage, which she previously said was “sexless”.

The presenter, 52, has reportedly signed up for Channel 4 show First Dates, where she will have another go at finding love.

According to The Sun, Jonsson will appear on a special celebrity episode in aid of Stand Up To Cancer.

It comes a few months after the star split from her husband Brian Monet.

The couple tied the knot in 2008 but parted company earlier this year.

Jonsson later said they only had sex once in eight-and-a-half years.

Read more: Ulrika Jonsson had sex with husband once in eight years

In a heartfelt article she penned for The Sun, she recalled how she thought she “might have to just accept that [she] would never have sex ever again”.

“The reason I thought this is because I had not had sex for four and half years,” she admitted.

“And the time before that was four years prior. I was living in a sexless marriage for nearly a decade.

Jonsson’s first marriage was to cameraman John Turnbull. The couple wed in 1990 and had a son together, but went their separate ways in 1995.

Read more: First Dates viewers heartbroken over contestant

She later had a relationship with German hotel manager Marcus Kempen and they had a daughter before calling time on their romance.

In 2003 she exchanged vows with Lance Gerrard-Wright after they met on a television show, and the pair welcomed a daughter in 2004 before separating the following year.

The former Gladiators star also has a son with Monet.

Jonsson’s episode of First Dates is reportedly set to air in the next few weeks.

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