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Captain Tom’s daughter admits taking £18,000 to judge charity award and hand out plaque

Captain Tom’s daughter has admitted taking £18,000 for an appearance at a charity awards which saw her handing out a plaque, while her father’s foundation only received £2,000.

Hannah Ingram-Moore had appeared on behalf of the Captain Sir Tom Moore Foundation, which is now being investigated by the Charity Commission following a series of revelations about its finances.

She was paid by Virgin Media to judge ‘The Virgin Media O2 Captain Tom Foundation Connector Award’ at the Ashton Vale Club for Young People in Bristol last year, and admitted accepting the fee during an interview with Piers Morgan.

She said: “That relationship with Virgin Media started way back in 2020. My father was paid to be a judge, and judges are often paid.

“I was doing it with him, because of course he couldn’t do it by himself. That relationship continued and they asked me to keep working with them.

The foundation in her father’s name only received £2,000 from the appearance (PA)
The foundation in her father’s name only received £2,000 from the appearance (PA)

“All of those discussions were happening even before I was imagining being interim CEO. So those plans were already in place.’

She added: “I think in hindsight what I should have done was stalled that relationship with Virgin O2 to afterwards.”

For their work during the Covid-19 pandemic, the Ashton Youth Club recieved £5,000 worth of technical equipment for their work.

The Captain Tom Foundation is currently being investigated for potential conflicts of interest and will close for good once the investigation comes to an end.

The foundation was first established in June 2020, after the Second World War veteran succeeeded in raising more than £30m for the NHS by walking 100 laps of his garden ahead of his 100th birthday. After receiving a knighthood from the Queen, he died in February 2021.

The couple have lost an appeal to keep a spa complex at their Grade II listed home (PA)
The couple have lost an appeal to keep a spa complex at their Grade II listed home (PA)

It has been closed to donations amid the ongoing inquiry into its finances, after the charity watchdog became concerned about arrangements between the charity and a company linked to Ms Ingram-Moore and her husband Colin.

The couple have recently lost an appeal to keep a spa complex on the grounds of their Grade II listed property in Marston Moretaine, Bedforshire.

They had applied for planning permission in 2021 to build a Captain Tom Foundation Building, with plans for the L-shaped building to house memorabilia and offices. However, a subsequent application was made in 2022 for a larger C-shaped building which contained a spa pool.

Despite being refused, it was built and has become the subject of an enforcement notice in July as a “now-unauthorised building”.

During her interview on Piers Morgan Uncensored, Ms Ingram-Moore also spoke of her £85,000 salary which she earned as the CEO of her father’s foundation.

In an interview with Piers Morgan, she insisted the family were right to keep the book profits (Piers Morgan Uncensored, Talk TV)
In an interview with Piers Morgan, she insisted the family were right to keep the book profits (Piers Morgan Uncensored, Talk TV)

Previously, the Charity Commission had stepped in to stop the foundation from employing Mrs Ingram-Moore as chief executive on a salary of £100,000, saying it was “neither reasonable nor justifiable”.

They also insisted the family were right to keep £800,000 made from three books written by her father, including his autobiography, despite the introduction implying that the money raised from sales would be donated to charity.

Ms Ingram-Moore told TalkTV: “These were my father’s books, and it was honestly such a joy for him to write them, but they were his books.

“He had an agent and they worked on that deal, and his wishes were that that money would sit in Club Nook, and in the end … ”

Morgan asked: “For you to keep?”, and she replied “Yes. Specifically.”

She insisted the books were “never anything to do with” the charity and there was never a contract or an agreement that the money raised in profits would be given to the foundation.