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They call him MC Squared: Meet the maths teacher who RAPS to his students

Jake '2 Pi' Scott decided to liven up arithmetic and formulas by working maths raps into his lessons - and he's quickly become a hit with his class.

It might not be the first school subject you'd associate with rapping, but one teacher has given his maths lessons a musical twist in a bid to engage his students.

Jake '2 Pi' Scott decided to liven up arithmetic and formulas by working maths raps into his lessons - and he's quickly become a hit with his class.

Mr Scott, a pre-calculus teacher at Montgomery Blair High School in Silver Springs, Maryland, had the idea to 'take the edge off math' with his unusual teaching techniques.

His catchy maths raps are even turned into YouTube videos, featuring himself, his students, and other teachers rapping key maths principles.


The teacher, 38, has already penned several other maths rap on subjects such as triangles, with one of his most recent offerings helping students with quadratic formulas.

He insists that the raps help students learn maths, because 'if you put a beat to it, students will remember it'.

Lyrical flavour: Mr Scott raps the principles of zero denominators

Helping hand: Mr Scott recruits some students to assist with his math rap video

He said of his maths raps last year: "I teach pre-calculus and noticed some of the students were struggling with the high level concepts.

"I figured I would rap concepts into the lessons to help students remember and engage.

"It exercises both sides of their brains, and that was my goal - just to help them become more and more enthusiastic about mathematics."

Mr Scott's latest video sees him rap about zero denominators, with the help of his young daughter.

In the video, he raps: "Come sit down with daddy 'coz it's time to study math / You'll study for a few then it's time to take your bath.

"The topic of the lesson is undefined expression / So please take a seat while I read the first question."

His students seem to appreciate his unorthodox teaching techniques too.

One pupil, Abdullah Ibrahim, 18, told the Washington Post: "He makes it easier for us to learn."