Anti-monarchy billboards spotted claiming 'Wales doesn't need a prince'

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Anti-monarchy billboards have been spotted across Wales. (Reach)
Anti-monarchy billboards have been spotted across Wales. (Reach)

Controversial billboards calling for an end to the monarchy have started appearing across Wales.

Photos of Prince Charles appearing alongside declarations that ‘Wales doesn’t need a prince’ have been spotted in Aberdare, Cardiff and Swansea.

The campaign has already seen billboards put up across the UK, aimed at calling for an end to sovereign power and stating that "the monarchy is a broken institution”.

It comes as Scotland’s charity regulator launched an investigation into claims the Prince of Wales’ charitable foundation accepted a six-figure sum from a wealthy Russian donor.

The first design of the billboards started to appear on UK streets from the end of July. (Crowdfunder)
The first design of the billboards started to appear on UK streets from the end of July. (Crowdfunder)
The billboards have been spotted in various places in Wales. (Reach)
The billboards have been spotted in various places in Wales. (Reach)

According to a YouGov survey earlier in the year, 54% of people have a positive view of Prince Charles, compared to 80% for the Queen.

YouGov data showed that Charles' popularity has declined in the past four months, as 58% of respondents had a positive view of him in April. 

Other senior royals including Princess Anne, Prince Andrew and Prince Edward also saw this percentage rating slip over the same period.

The survey also that the popularity of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle slipped to a record low following their move to the US and fallout from their interview with Oprah Winfrey.

Watch: Prince Charles's former aide keeps silent over honour claims

The controversial billboard campaign is the brainchild of non party-political organisation Republic, who first introduced them in July.

The group argue on their website a "hereditary public office goes against every democratic principle”, adding that the Queen and the Royal Family cannot be held to account via the ballot box, unlike political parties and others in power.

The investigation launched by the Scottish charity regulator follows an alleged cash-for-honours scandal which saw Charles’ former royal valet, Michael Fawcett, temporarily step down as the foundation’s chief executive earlier this month.

Fawcett was suspected of breaching the Honours (Prevention of Abuses) Act 1925 over accusations that he promised to help secure a knighthood and British citizenship for a Saudi billionaire donor.

Other billboards from Republic have appeared in different parts of the UK. (Crowdfunder)
Other billboards from Republic have appeared in different parts of the UK. (Crowdfunder)
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM - JUNE 08: (EMBARGOED FOR PUBLICATION IN UK NEWSPAPERS UNTIL 24 HOURS AFTER CREATE DATE AND TIME) Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, Prince Louis of Cambridge, Prince George of Cambridge, Princess Charlotte of Cambridge, Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, Prince Charles, Prince of Wales and Queen Elizabeth II watch a flypast from the balcony of Buckingham Palace during Trooping The Colour, the Queen's annual birthday parade, on June 8, 2019 in London, England. The annual ceremony involving over 1400 guardsmen and cavalry, is believed to have first been performed during the reign of King Charles II. The parade marks the official birthday of the Sovereign, although the Queen's actual birthday is on April 21st. (Photo by Max Mumby/Indigo/Getty Images)
Campaign group Republic are calling for the abolition of the monarchy. (Getty)

Republic, who contacted Scotland Yard over the cash-for-honours allegations, proposes a new elected head of state should be put in place to "represent our hopes and aspirations – and help us keep politicians in check".

Over £25,000 has so far been raised for the group on a Crowdfunder page, aimed at funding more strongly-worded billboards to be placed around the country.

Watch: Harry and Meghan named in Time 100 most influential list on duke's birthday

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