Can you spot the hidden camera used by fraudsters on this cash machine?

·Contributor
The cashpoint contains a secret camera located over the receipt slot on the far left (Met Police)
The cashpoint contains a secret camera located over the receipt slot on the far left (Met Police)

Police have warned cash machine users to be extra vigilant after an off-duty officer discovered a hidden camera on an ATM.

The concealed lens, which is very difficult to spot with an untrained eye, was clocked by an off-duty constable at a cashpoint in London.

Off duty @MPSNewham Special Constable has sniffed out a covert camera recording the pin pad of this ATM in @MPSWestminster’, Police wrote on Twitter.

‘This is why it is so important to #CoverYourPin when taking out cash.’

The camera is hidden behind an extra panel placed over the receipt slot in order to spy on PINs from unsuspecting users as they withdraw cash.

An extra panel covers the camera, which is almost impossible for most people to spot
An extra panel covers the camera, which is almost impossible for most people to spot

Once the PIN is obtained, fraudsters are able to steal cards and make large withdrawals before it is cancelled.

An extra panel is fitted over the receipt slot of the ATM, hiding the camera.
An extra panel is fitted over the receipt slot of the ATM, hiding the camera.

The photo below shows the extra panel after at was removed by the vigilant police constable. The real receipt slot is behind the hidden equipment.

The camera forms a fake panel over the receipt
The camera forms a fake panel over the receipt

Fraudsters have also been known to use a skimmer device that fits over the card slot, designed to copy the information contained on the magnetic strip of a bank card.

Other methods include card traps which are used to swallow the cards of unsuspecting users, before thieves later return to remove the trap from the slot and use the withheld cards.

MOST POPULAR TODAY ON YAHOO

Cashpoint users across the UK are strongly advised to check every cash machine used, as well as covering their keypad when entering a PIN.

If anyone thinks they have been targeted, they are advised to report it to Action Fraud on 0300 123 2040.

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting