Theresa May sneaks into Grenfell memorial service through back door of St Paul's Cathedral

Nick Reilly
·Contributor
Theresa May enters at the back of St Pauls Cathedral (Picture: REX)
Theresa May enters at the back of St Pauls Cathedral (Picture: REX)

Theresa May was sneaked into the Grenfell Tower memorial service in London earlier today – entering through the back door of St Paul’s Cathedral.

The service was attended by dignitaries including Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn and the Prince of Wales, Duchess of Cornwall, Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry.

The Prime Minister eschewed an entrance through the front of the building and instead opted to make a subdued entry through St Paul’s churchyard gardens, before taking her seat next to Communities Secretary Sajid Javid.

Her attendance at the service comes after she was accused of ‘failing to show humanity’ when she failed to speak with survivors in the days immediately after the tragic blaze.

Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn and Diane Abbott arrive at St Paul’s Cathedral (Picture: REUTERS/Daniel Leal-Olivas/Pool)
Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn and Diane Abbott arrive at St Paul’s Cathedral (Picture: REUTERS/Daniel Leal-Olivas/Pool)

The memorial focused on remembering the 71 victims of the June 14 tower block blaze, and providing those affected with messages of support, strength and hope for the future.

As the ceremony began, A Green For Grenfell banner adorned with a heart was carried in as a hymn was sung, before the Very Reverend Dr David Ison, Dean of St Paul’s, welcomed the congregation.

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He told the congregation: ‘Among us are survivors of the fire in Grenfell Tower exactly six months ago; those who have lost members of their families, or their friends; those who live or work in North Kensington as neighbours and members of the local community; those who served others as frontline responders or volunteers, or who assisted with the immediate tasks of coping with the losses of lives, homes and livelihoods; and there are representatives of our national life, because this is a nation that grieves at the unspeakable tragedy, loss and hurt of that June day.’